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Are you looking for an engine driven compressor or a stand-alone unit?

 

 

The naxja guys know of a cheap 12V jobby that apparently 'works' - probably not well.

 

 

If you go engine driven, you can use the stock sanden AC compressor as long as you install an inline oiler. Or, you can use a GM sanden compressor which has an internal oiling system. Or, you can get a york compressor out of a FSJ or Volvo.

 

Another option is the 12V compressor for air ride caddy's.

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I saw a guy that had compressed air inside a homemade rear bumper. Not sure how he did it, just an idea.

 

 

It was most likely a bumper made out of HSS (square tube) that had the ends welded up. Then a NPT fitting to attach a quick release would have been tapped in.

 

 

The tank is simply filled by any source of compressed air (gas station, your shop compressor, etc) and a hose and air chuick are carried along to use it when needed.

 

 

It's alright as long as you have enough bumper.

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I am a firm believer in the CO2 tanks or 12 volt compressors. Lets think about this your tore your rig up.. and now you have to replace(pick what ever part you desire) YOu have to have the vehicle running to use an engine driven unit... not always the best option if you have to work under it, or wher the exhaust is. 12v or bottle setup use it when needed. Only problem with tanks is they run out. Just as with engine driven system you might have to run the engine to charge the battery depending on how long it takes you

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The key is to get a feel for how long a 10lb bottle lasts. More than enough for a weekend for me, and I use the impact to swap tow tires and trail tires back and forth. I have a $10 compressor as backup. Not fast, but if I'm truly in a pinch, it does work.

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Funny story about a bumper tank I once saw. The guy used his setup on the trail and then proceeded to not unhook the unit and kept it compressing for the rest of the trip. He drove home on the highway and once he got home noticed his new "pregnant" bumper and had one of those "Oh Shi!" moments...

 

great way to test your welding skills :rotfl2:

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I have a Quick Air 1 that I had in my XJ. It fit so nicely in the wheel well... it will reseat a bead, I've done it five or six times, but it's slower than dirt.

 

I'm going with the engine compressor on my MJ (no AC) and I have hand tools as a backup (heh heh)...

 

That reminds me the shop I had my trailer tires replaced at had this little 10 gallon tank that they filled to about 150psi from the main line and then shot all that air into the tire bead through a half blocked 2" steel barrel that came off the tank. It was homemade and worked great. No better than lighter fluid or whatever, but it would be really cool to whip one out on the trail and reseat someone's tire with it... It's loud as heck and a great way to show off how much stuff you can take.

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Jage,

Does your tank have an adjustable regulator? I cannot see how it could be slow if it can seat a bead, as this requires a large amount of air all at once. What is the pressure set at?

 

As you see above, I have a 10 & a 20lb setup, one for each rig and I have no issues with reseating beads, same as you. But mine will fill a tire in about 15 - 20 secs, from 10 pounds to street pressure. With the pressure set at about 100. Faster with it higher. :eek: :roll:

 

I have tried them @$$ and nothing I have found will be faster on the trail than the CO2 set up. As long as its pressure is adjustable.

 

CW

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Actually it's just the quick air I and no tank. It will reseat a bead just fine. You just have to be patient. Reseating a bead takes pressure not speed, it's just with mega speed you don't have to be patient or terribly careful.

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Actually it's just the quick air I and no tank. It will reseat a bead just fine. You just have to be patient. Reseating a bead takes pressure not speed, it's just with mega speed you don't have to be patient or terribly careful.

 

Can you translate for me?

 

Quick air I I am OK with whats NO TANK? Where is the co2 held?

 

Agreed its volume of air to seat a bead, not speed.

 

Your part of your last sentance... I don't understand what your trying to say. :roll:

 

CW

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I have the Kilby on board air engine driven setup on my rubicon.

 

Both front and rear bumpers are converted to air tanks. I can seat a bead or run air tools. Fills up my 36" Iroks pretty quick from 3 psi to 30.

 

My backup system is another ruby with the same setup that my better half drives. :chillin:

 

Tim

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  • 8 years later...

I saw a guy that had compressed air inside a homemade rear bumper. Not sure how he did it, just an idea.

I had this.

 

 

I saw a guy that had compressed air inside a homemade rear bumper. Not sure how he did it, just an idea.

 

It was most likely a bumper made out of HSS (square tube) that had the ends welded up. Then a NPT fitting to attach a quick release would have been tapped in.

 

 

The tank is simply filled by any source of compressed air (gas station, your shop compressor, etc) and a hose and air chuick are carried along to use it when needed.

 

 

It's alright as long as you have enough bumper.

 

Thats what I did, I had a ranch hand bumper on a superduty pickup. I welded the ends shut and sealed it off, then added a gauge and outlet, the truck was wired with a 12v air compressor for my airbags so I just plumbed it in to a manifold. the downside was it took alot of time to fill the bumper up when it was empty, however having the pressure built up helped when airing a flat tire. when pressurized to 120psi it would fill a tire up to about 40psi without a compressor. so it works well as a tank, but not necessarily as a stand alone solution.

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x2  My CO2 tank works awesome.

 

 

I also have on board air.  I used the stock Sanden air compressor for it.   I have an inline tool oiler to provide oil to the compressor. Then a stainless braided high temp hose coming off the compressor, a check valve, oil/water separator, and an air manifold.  Coming off the manifold I have a gauge that goes into the cab, on/off pressure switch, air line going to an air chuck on the front bumper, blow off valve, a regulated output for my ARB lockers, and a hose going to a 3 gallon tank mounted under the bed.  From the tank I have another air chuck mounted in my bed that is regulated to 100psi to run tools off of.

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