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Minuit

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About Minuit

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    MJ Maniac

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    radio-emporium.com

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    Columbia, TN

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  1. The red gauge cluster was introduced for '88, or possibly late in the '87 model year. The '87 blue cluster is unique to that model year but it is compatible with '87 through '90 vehicles. The '84 to '86 cluster looks similar but is very different otherwise.
  2. Dome lights are full-time power, ground-side switched. Red would be constant 12V. Tan would be a switched ground from the door switch or headlight dimmer, and black will be a full time ground (so the light comes on when you push the light to turn it on)
  3. That is, in fact, how it works. You'll notice that the cam sprocket is twice the size of the crank sprocket and has twice as many teeth. When connected together by the timing chain, the cam will rotate at half the speed of the crank. When two sprockets are connected by a chain, the relative speeds of each sprocket can be found with the following formula: S1 x T1 = S2 x T2 S being the rotational speed, and T being the tooth count of each sprocket. Rearrange some terms around and you can get: S1 / S2 = T2 / T1 On a Jeep 4.0, the crankshaft sprocket has 18 teeth. We'll call that sprocket 1. The camshaft sprocket has 36. That'll be sprocket 2. Plugging in 18 for T1 and 36 for T2, S1 / S2 = 36 / 18 or.. S1 / S2 = 2 or.. S1 = 2 x S2 In other words, sprocket 1 (crank) will rotate at twice the speed of sprocket 2 (cam). Since the sprockets are tightly connected to each other and cannot "slip", that means that the crankshaft will rotate twice for every rotation of the camshaft.
  4. Power windows and locks were available up to, I believe, 1990. By 1991 they definitely were NOT available.
  5. Honestly, I really doubt the radio is worth the price of a used faceplate. That's an entry-level aftermarket radio from 2006, so I doubt your prospects will be good anywhere other than eBay, but the pickings will probably be slim anywhere you look. There are so many different aftermarket radios out there and models change so often that it can be very hard to find parts for a specific one. "Good luck" is about the only help I can offer you.
  6. If your front tires are out of balance laterally (also known as "dynamic imbalance", also known as "side-to-side shakiness"), that can be the root cause of death wobble. That was it in my '89. Replacing suspension parts made it better, but it never addressed the root cause. As a side note - 99% of MJs are probably driving around on worn steering dampers. Replace it, but replace it after the death wobble is solved. I got full-on death wobble on the way to the tire shop hitting an expansion joint at 40 mph. Since having "new" tires put on, I've been intentionally driving right into every bump I can trying to make it happen. Hasn't done it a single time. Side note - the only time I've experienced anything close to death wobble in my '91, it was from the right front wheel being held on by three broken studs and two very loose lugnuts. I'm a believer now - in cases of death wobble, look to the tires and wheels first.
  7. I eventually plan on getting my original wheel leather wrapped, but my hope was to find an OEM one to "try on" to make sure I liked it and to have something while my original was being worked on. Plus it'd be nice to have an example to give to the shop and say "make me another one of this" I found one that someone recovered for fairly cheap on eBay, might grab it. I've heard that the leather on those aftermarket ones can sometimes be loose on the spokes - that's the only thing scaring me off.
  8. Looking for a black leather wrapped 3-spoke steering wheel in as good of condition as possible. I don't need the horn button or any of the horn hardware. The factory perforated leather is strongly preferred, but I wouldn't be opposed to one with a well-done custom leather wrap job. Let me know what you've got.
  9. Minuit

    Knock on the door?

    If someone knocked on my door asking about my truck, I wouldn't mind talking to them... if the dogs didn't scare them off. On the other hand, if I saw someone walk up to my truck and start taking pictures (especially of the VIN tag) without talking to me first, that would provoke an ENTIRELY different response.
  10. The threads most likely got chowdered in the process of pulling the wheel without using a tool to properly center on the tip of the column. The tip of the column shaft should have a lot more material on it. While we're on the subject, here's my preferred tool set for working on these GM steering columns. https://www.amazon.com/OTC-7927A-Steering-Remover-Compressor/dp/B000XSCEMQ/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=otc+steering+column&qid=1573257226&sr=8-1
  11. And that's why you use a proper steering wheel puller tool to pull the wheel off.
  12. Plot twist, her husband IS the Comanche
  13. Great find. Took me FOREVER to find a full set of covers with no tears. Definitely on my "grab every good one I see for spares" list
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