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transmission crossmember out = frame bowed in?


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Why do you waste time posting and asking questions...over and over again.....you do not want help.....you just want a post count.....I would offer a cash reward for any member who can find one of your posts were there was a resolution (proven) to the original question you posted post.... :shake:

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Why do you waste time posting and asking questions...over and over again.....you do not want help.....you just want a post count.....I would offer a cash reward for any member who can find one of your posts were there was a resolution (proven) to the original question you posted post.... :shake:

post count? there's no point in that, i'm actually lookin for answears and doin research,

 

Redwolf

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Let me attempt to clarify xymj's point with a timeline.

1. You vaguely describe an issue you think you have. I don't run out of fingers counting the number of words you use.

2. Based on your very short and vague description, we can agree that there might be an issue. We don't know what it is because we don't really know what's going on. Only you do.

3. We ask for clarification about your issue so we can help. We suggest you take a picture to help clarify because you don't have the greatest history with words. (Not everyone does. Not everyone's good a getting a clear picture of what's going on from only words either.)

4. You don't follow our suggestion because it's a lot of work. (Which is understandable in this exact instance. I wouldn't drop my tranny just to take a picture, either.). But you also don't really try to clarify any other way.

5. We still can't suggest any way to resolve your issue because we still don't really know what your issue is. Some of us aren't sure it's worth the effort to try to help you because we don't know if you'll even listen to our suggestions.

6. It goes back and forth, we repeat ourselves, you repeat yourself, you can't/don't do what we suggest, and it continues until everyone is frustrated and gives up.

7. Your issue (if there even is an issue) goes unresolved.

8. You're back next week with another issue, when you haven't finished with the first.

9. The cycle repeats. Your issues mostly go unsolved, people get frustrated with you, and the only thing to show for all the time and effort is that post counts have gone up.

 

What should you take away from this post?

Don't go drop your transmission just to take a picture. 

Many of the members here want to help you, but we aren't magic workers. We can't see what's happening through our keyboards. You're there dealing with the problem, we're not. You know what's going on (sometimes) but we don't. You have to help us if you want us to help you.

When you're working on something you need to think ahead. When you notice an issue, document it so you know what's happening. Document what looks wrong, and why you think it's wrong. Document what makes it look wrong, and how it compares to what you think it should look like if it wasn't wrong. Be specific. Sometimes it helps to keep a log book to write stuff down. Trust me, you will forget. (As an aside, in my engineering design classes, log books are often worth just as much as the actual designing process, and usually more than the finished prototype. In the professional field, your log book is your only defense when something goes wrong, and a professional engineer can have a $#!& ton go wrong because of the smallest slip-up... but if you haven't documented everything, there's no proof that you didn't screw up, and that building that collapsed or that nuclear power plant that exploded and all the people who died as a result will be pinned on you whether it was really your fault or not. I was going to keep going with that, but it's stretching the point... clear and accurate description of what you did, what you noticed, and what happened is very important.)

 If something doesn't look right, stop and figure out why not before continuing. It's less work to figure out something isn't an issue than it is to put something back together only to have to take it apart again because you didn't bother finding out. If something doesn't look like it's where it should be, wiggle it around to see if it's properly secured. If something looks like it's bent, give it a tug to see if it bends easily.

In this case, it's a little late for that now. We're ASSuming from you posts that you'd already got everything buttoned back together. Which is fine. Don't go tearing it all apart again unless you know there's a problem and you know how to resolve it.

 

 

Going back to your problem. Here I'm trying to help you clarify your problem. Please answer this question:

What makes you think the frame is bowed in?

Here's a list of further questions to help you answer that question. You don't need to answer them, just keep them in mind when you answer the above. They will be conflicting because it's all the things I can think of that you could mean, so consider them all individually.

Was the crossmember hard to remove or put back because it seemed like the holes didn't line up? Is it possible that something happened to the crossmember to cause the holes not to line up? Does the "bowing" affect the entire frame rail or just a small section of it? Does it look like the frame rails moved from where they should be? Are the frame rails still firmly attached to the bottom of the cab? Do the frame rails look like they have cracks or stretched sections in them? Are your frame rails symmetrical? Are the frame rails closer together somewhere than they are somewhere else? Does your truck look like a banana? Did the frame rails move back and forth? Did the frame rails twist? Did the frame rails show respect to you as though you were their master? Am I running out of ideas quickly?

If any of the above seem accurate, don't just copy my words. Use your own words to describe the way it is, and elaborate further. As in "the truck looks like a banana. The front end of the truck points up away from the ground, but the back end does too. If you drew a line parallel to the cab it would make a V-shape with a line parallel to the bed. The middle of the truck is lower than either end.". It would be helpful to start your answer with "I think my frame was bowed in because ... ".

Again, I'm trying to help you. If you think this seems too much like being in school, guess what: school is there to prepare you for an adult life in the real world. Life isn't like school, school is like life... just easier.

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no rust under the manche or around the crossmemeber and i'd love to take a pic but i hate droppin transmissions and it did it with the trans out and crossmember off and i don't know bout pushin and pullin it together and away,

If you don't know what happens when pushing the rails together or pulling them apart, how did you determine that the frame bowed in as stated in the title of the opening post? In the post I quoted above, you wrote that "... it did it with the trans out and crossmember off ..." but nowhere have you clearly stated what "it" is.

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Let me attempt to clarify xymj's point with a timeline.

1. You vaguely describe an issue you think you have. I don't run out of fingers counting the number of words you use.

2. Based on your very short and vague description, we can agree that there might be an issue. We don't know what it is because we don't really know what's going on. Only you do.

3. We ask for clarification about your issue so we can help. We suggest you take a picture to help clarify because you don't have the greatest history with words. (Not everyone does. Not everyone's good a getting a clear picture of what's going on from only words either.)

4. You don't follow our suggestion because it's a lot of work. (Which is understandable in this exact instance. I wouldn't drop my tranny just to take a picture, either.). But you also don't really try to clarify any other way.

5. We still can't suggest any way to resolve your issue because we still don't really know what your issue is. Some of us aren't sure it's worth the effort to try to help you because we don't know if you'll even listen to our suggestions.

6. It goes back and forth, we repeat ourselves, you repeat yourself, you can't/don't do what we suggest, and it continues until everyone is frustrated and gives up.

7. Your issue (if there even is an issue) goes unresolved.

8. You're back next week with another issue, when you haven't finished with the first.

9. The cycle repeats. Your issues mostly go unsolved, people get frustrated with you, and the only thing to show for all the time and effort is that post counts have gone up.

 

What should you take away from this post?

Don't go drop your transmission just to take a picture. 

Many of the members here want to help you, but we aren't magic workers. We can't see what's happening through our keyboards. You're there dealing with the problem, we're not. You know what's going on (sometimes) but we don't. You have to help us if you want us to help you.

When you're working on something you need to think ahead. When you notice an issue, document it so you know what's happening. Document what looks wrong, and why you think it's wrong. Document what makes it look wrong, and how it compares to what you think it should look like if it wasn't wrong. Be specific. Sometimes it helps to keep a log book to write stuff down. Trust me, you will forget. (As an aside, in my engineering design classes, log books are often worth just as much as the actual designing process, and usually more than the finished prototype. In the professional field, your log book is your only defense when something goes wrong, and a professional engineer can have a $#!& ton go wrong because of the smallest slip-up... but if you haven't documented everything, there's no proof that you didn't screw up, and that building that collapsed or that nuclear power plant that exploded and all the people who died as a result will be pinned on you whether it was really your fault or not. I was going to keep going with that, but it's stretching the point... clear and accurate description of what you did, what you noticed, and what happened is very important.)

 If something doesn't look right, stop and figure out why not before continuing. It's less work to figure out something isn't an issue than it is to put something back together only to have to take it apart again because you didn't bother finding out. If something doesn't look like it's where it should be, wiggle it around to see if it's properly secured. If something looks like it's bent, give it a tug to see if it bends easily.

In this case, it's a little late for that now. We're ASSuming from you posts that you'd already got everything buttoned back together. Which is fine. Don't go tearing it all apart again unless you know there's a problem and you know how to resolve it.

 

 

Going back to your problem. Here I'm trying to help you clarify your problem. Please answer this question:

What makes you think the frame is bowed in?

Here's a list of further questions to help you answer that question. You don't need to answer them, just keep them in mind when you answer the above. They will be conflicting because it's all the things I can think of that you could mean, so consider them all individually.

Was the crossmember hard to remove or put back because it seemed like the holes didn't line up? Is it possible that something happened to the crossmember to cause the holes not to line up? Does the "bowing" affect the entire frame rail or just a small section of it? Does it look like the frame rails moved from where they should be? Are the frame rails still firmly attached to the bottom of the cab? Do the frame rails look like they have cracks or stretched sections in them? Are your frame rails symmetrical? Are the frame rails closer together somewhere than they are somewhere else? Does your truck look like a banana? Did the frame rails move back and forth? Did the frame rails twist? Did the frame rails show respect to you as though you were their master? Am I running out of ideas quickly?

If any of the above seem accurate, don't just copy my words. Use your own words to describe the way it is, and elaborate further. As in "the truck looks like a banana. The front end of the truck points up away from the ground, but the back end does too. If you drew a line parallel to the cab it would make a V-shape with a line parallel to the bed. The middle of the truck is lower than either end.". It would be helpful to start your answer with "I think my frame was bowed in because ... ".

Again, I'm trying to help you. If you think this seems too much like being in school, guess what: school is there to prepare you for an adult life in the real world. Life isn't like school, school is like life... just easier.

YA....what he said.....................................but I could have rebuilt your whole truck( red dog) in the time it would have taken me  to type what gogmorgo just did .... :thumbsup:

 

 

:popcorn:  :popcorn:  :popcorn:  :popcorn:

 

WHATS NEXT......................................................................

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Let me attempt to clarify xymj's point with a timeline.

1. You vaguely describe an issue you think you have. I don't run out of fingers counting the number of words you use.

2. Based on your very short and vague description, we can agree that there might be an issue. We don't know what it is because we don't really know what's going on. Only you do.

3. We ask for clarification about your issue so we can help. We suggest you take a picture to help clarify because you don't have the greatest history with words. (Not everyone does. Not everyone's good a getting a clear picture of what's going on from only words either.)

4. You don't follow our suggestion because it's a lot of work. (Which is understandable in this exact instance. I wouldn't drop my tranny just to take a picture, either.). But you also don't really try to clarify any other way.

5. We still can't suggest any way to resolve your issue because we still don't really know what your issue is. Some of us aren't sure it's worth the effort to try to help you because we don't know if you'll even listen to our suggestions.

6. It goes back and forth, we repeat ourselves, you repeat yourself, you can't/don't do what we suggest, and it continues until everyone is frustrated and gives up.

7. Your issue (if there even is an issue) goes unresolved.

8. You're back next week with another issue, when you haven't finished with the first.

9. The cycle repeats. Your issues mostly go unsolved, people get frustrated with you, and the only thing to show for all the time and effort is that post counts have gone up.

 

What should you take away from this post?

Don't go drop your transmission just to take a picture. 

Many of the members here want to help you, but we aren't magic workers. We can't see what's happening through our keyboards. You're there dealing with the problem, we're not. You know what's going on (sometimes) but we don't. You have to help us if you want us to help you.

When you're working on something you need to think ahead. When you notice an issue, document it so you know what's happening. Document what looks wrong, and why you think it's wrong. Document what makes it look wrong, and how it compares to what you think it should look like if it wasn't wrong. Be specific. Sometimes it helps to keep a log book to write stuff down. Trust me, you will forget. (As an aside, in my engineering design classes, log books are often worth just as much as the actual designing process, and usually more than the finished prototype. In the professional field, your log book is your only defense when something goes wrong, and a professional engineer can have a $#!& ton go wrong because of the smallest slip-up... but if you haven't documented everything, there's no proof that you didn't screw up, and that building that collapsed or that nuclear power plant that exploded and all the people who died as a result will be pinned on you whether it was really your fault or not. I was going to keep going with that, but it's stretching the point... clear and accurate description of what you did, what you noticed, and what happened is very important.)

 If something doesn't look right, stop and figure out why not before continuing. It's less work to figure out something isn't an issue than it is to put something back together only to have to take it apart again because you didn't bother finding out. If something doesn't look like it's where it should be, wiggle it around to see if it's properly secured. If something looks like it's bent, give it a tug to see if it bends easily.

In this case, it's a little late for that now. We're ASSuming from you posts that you'd already got everything buttoned back together. Which is fine. Don't go tearing it all apart again unless you know there's a problem and you know how to resolve it.

 

 

Going back to your problem. Here I'm trying to help you clarify your problem. Please answer this question:

What makes you think the frame is bowed in?

Here's a list of further questions to help you answer that question. You don't need to answer them, just keep them in mind when you answer the above. They will be conflicting because it's all the things I can think of that you could mean, so consider them all individually.

Was the crossmember hard to remove or put back because it seemed like the holes didn't line up? Is it possible that something happened to the crossmember to cause the holes not to line up? Does the "bowing" affect the entire frame rail or just a small section of it? Does it look like the frame rails moved from where they should be? Are the frame rails still firmly attached to the bottom of the cab? Do the frame rails look like they have cracks or stretched sections in them? Are your frame rails symmetrical? Are the frame rails closer together somewhere than they are somewhere else? Does your truck look like a banana? Did the frame rails move back and forth? Did the frame rails twist? Did the frame rails show respect to you as though you were their master? Am I running out of ideas quickly?

If any of the above seem accurate, don't just copy my words. Use your own words to describe the way it is, and elaborate further. As in "the truck looks like a banana. The front end of the truck points up away from the ground, but the back end does too. If you drew a line parallel to the cab it would make a V-shape with a line parallel to the bed. The middle of the truck is lower than either end.". It would be helpful to start your answer with "I think my frame was bowed in because ... ".

Again, I'm trying to help you. If you think this seems too much like being in school, guess what: school is there to prepare you for an adult life in the real world. Life isn't like school, school is like life... just easier.

YA....what he said.....................................but I could have rebuilt your whole truck( red dog) in the time it would have taken me  to type what gogmorgo just did .... :thumbsup:

 

 

:popcorn:  :popcorn:  :popcorn:  :popcorn:

 

WHATS NEXT......................................................................

 

More of the same...............

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so me and my dad dropped my trans yesterday to see why my clutch wouldn't disengage and i noticed that when we took the crossmember out the frame bowed in, i can't remember if it did that last time or not...is this normal or is a new MJ in my future,

 

Redwolf

Every time, all I can think of is this.

 

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