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would you buy this?


irishman999
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How much would you pay?  

29 members have voted

  1. 1. How much would you pay?

    • 300
      1
    • 250-300
      2
    • 200-250
      11
    • i wouldnt buy it, it looks terrible.
      15


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The bumper shell is 1/8th inch plate steel, the flat edge around the top is 1/4 inch thick 1 inch angle iron, inside is a 2"x4" 1/4" thick square tube that ties the two mounting brackets together and is all tied into the bumper through the inside supports. Its built kind of like an airplane wing. The D rings come from my local industrial supply, they are probibly the strongest part of the bumper, we use them on our equipment trailer at work to hold down a 25,000 pound backhoe (we tie off to 4 of them). I'm hopefully going to be doing some extensive testing in the next week.

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... The D rings come from my local industrial supply, they are probibly the strongest part of the bumper, we use them on our equipment trailer at work to hold down a 25,000 pound backhoe (we tie off to 4 of them). I'm hopefully going to be doing some extensive testing in the next week.

 

A static load and an impact or repeated load are two totally different things. Rule of thumb is a saftey factor of 6 is given for ductile materials (i.e. mild steel) under static load and double that for impact. I would consider the D rings to see impact loads. Tow strap and jerk. I see folks using this design often, but for me I want 0.5" plate running all the way through the bumper and tied to the frame, welded on both sides with a 3/4" hole drilled through it to mount clevis type d rings to. looks like a great bumper for personal use but, I personally don't see much marketability there.

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... The D rings come from my local industrial supply, they are probibly the strongest part of the bumper, we use them on our equipment trailer at work to hold down a 25,000 pound backhoe (we tie off to 4 of them). I'm hopefully going to be doing some extensive testing in the next week.

 

A static load and an impact or repeated load are two totally different things. Rule of thumb is a saftey factor of 6 is given for ductile materials (i.e. mild steel) under static load and double that for impact. I would consider the D rings to see impact loads. Tow strap and jerk. I see folks using this design often, but for me I want 0.5" plate running all the way through the bumper and tied to the frame, welded on both sides with a 3/4" hole drilled through it to mount clevis type d rings to. looks like a great bumper for personal use but, I personally don't see much marketability there.

 

:agree:

 

If you are trying to sell this as a bumper that can be used as a recovery point you also need to include pictures of how the bumper attaches to the unibody. At this point, from your description, I have no idea how it attaches or if you fully understand how important it is to distribute the load across as many mounting points as possible. My first guess would be that you only used the mounting locations for the stock bumper to attach this?

 

Aesthetically it leaves a lot to be desired. You really need to tighten up those gaps if this is something you want to market. Gaps of several inches between the bumper and grill just looks cheap and unfinished.

 

Better pictures would also help. It is hard to see the details when everything is in the shadows.

 

Willy

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yeah, Its just really tough to make a plate style bumper look nice (i.e. worth money) with out the proper tooling, especially on a mass production scale. That is why the ones that do look well are fairly expensive. you need a CNC laser cutter and press break that is capable of at least 1/4 plate. A good design software able to produce G/M code would be helpful too. I think, If your looking to market an effective and economic bumper, the round tube design is much more achievable for a small shop. Not only does it offer advantages in weight savings, but can be just as strong if made properly. All you need here is a decent manual, mandrel bender, welder, and a good eye for aesthetics. And just for me, as a consumer, I have no interest in hanging 150lbs of plate steel off the front of a uni-body (sheet metal). I'm not attacking your idea, just being honest. I think you made a very nice DIY, home-made, one-off bumper for yourself.

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Thanks everyone for your informative feedback, thats why i like this site so much, the experts. Those pictures are terrible, i took them with a cell phone haha. I will work on getting another digital camera so i can take some beter ones and some shots of the inside and hopefully try this again.

 

Glad to see your not so sensitive. :rotfl2: Only mean in the sense some people post like you then no like what they here. But yeah get some better pics and pics front and back tie in mounts and all that and can give you some better feed back on what you actually have there.

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I see it as... any room for improvment in my project here is very welcome, if somethings crappy i would love to change it. I'm glad people take the time to post something. I'm drawing the line at tube bumpers, personally i can't stand the looks, and they remind me of pipe organs, I'm not throwing mud and I'm not a hardcore off roader. If your a hardcore off roader this bumper isnt for you and your probibly going to build your own kick a$$ bumper.

 

This started a while ago when i was shopping around for a bumper for my truck, i didnt like anything i saw and wouldnt pay the money for it. I pictured in my head what i wanted and sat down with some graph paper and some beers and drew the plans, priced the material and baught a bunch of tools. My bumpers done and i like the way it looked and figured maybe someone else would want one.

 

Everything i saw was to big and bulky, or it looked like it was designed to tread water so i wanted to get my own style.

Instead of having a poll about how much you would pay for it i should simply asked if the style is anything anyone liked haha.

Its not so much about money, i just have some free time and tools and a wanted to learn more.

 

I understand the shockload on my D-rings, what could anyone suggest for testing the shockload of this bumper to make sure its safe?

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I agree that tube bumpers don't match the jeeps as well as say toyotas. There is just alot of exposed area under the grill to fill in on these. Plus the body lines lend themselves to a square look.

 

Have you seen this truck? Aesthetically speaking, I believe the contrast of the tube bumpers compliment and quite possibly enhances the MJ box, thus creating the perfect balance of vehicular art. :clapping:

 

 

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When I first looked at the picture I thought you took a rear bumper like a Tomken and adapted it for the front of your MJ... That style of D-ring would be kinda hard to use off-road.. where does the loop from the strap attach to it?? I wouldn't be interested in it.. The looks and functionality would drive me away, plus with no idea on how it attaches to the unibody, I would be VERY leery of it no matter whether it was attractive or not.

 

BTW... chalk me up for the no tube bumpers. Just don't like the looks.

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I agree that tube bumpers don't match the jeeps as well as say toyotas. There is just alot of exposed area under the grill to fill in on these. Plus the body lines lend themselves to a square look.

 

Have you seen this truck? Aesthetically speaking, I believe the contrast of the tube bumpers compliment and quite possibly enhances the MJ box, thus creating the perfect balance of vehicular art. :clapping:

 

 

 

haha...got to say I love the rear! Not too wild about the smitty front tho...but hey its a classic.

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Reminds me of the 'cow catcher' off of a train. Granted, they had a little more style about it.

 

Slope the bottom more, add in the piece missing in the middle, extend the sides out and around to the flare (for those willing to cut) or just out farther with a slope on the ends. Don't use tie-downs for D-rings, add real D-ring mounts that go through and attach to the brackets that tie the bumper into the uniframe (which I hope are long brackets that pick up all the steering box bolts and etc).

 

:dunno:

 

I wouldn't buy a bumper either way.

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I could make you one. The tube bender is at my brothers in coos bay but he could probably bring it to my place in Vancouver, i want to make a rear bumper for mine anyway.

 

 

Seriously? Let me know what you need and I’ll pick up the materials and booze (if you’re a drinker). If you want, PM me and we can trade contact info… Definitely stay in touch!

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