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Cash for clunker blow ups...


dasbulliwagen
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We just did our first two CFC killings, one Dodoge ram 1500 with a 360, and a suburban, they died in a very non exciting way. We poured in the sodium silicate (liquid glass) and they just slowly ground to a halt. Thats it! Two down 20 to go, including 5 XJs, 3 ZJs, and one WJ. RIP

 

Are you allowed to pull parts out of the cars?

 

Where do the cars go once you kill them?

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We just did our first two CFC killings, one Dodoge ram 1500 with a 360, and a suburban, they died in a very non exciting way. We poured in the sodium silicate (liquid glass) and they just slowly ground to a halt. Thats it! Two down 20 to go, including 5 XJs, 3 ZJs, and one WJ. RIP

 

Are you allowed to pull parts out of the cars?

 

Where do the cars go once you kill them?

 

 

Our dealership owner has allowed us employees that showed interest, remove body and interior parts from the vehicle at no charge to us. I know there are many dealers who are not allowing this. Our sales dept even sold wheels off of some of them before we even got a chance at parts. I got a ton of stuff for my MJ, including an entire front clip off of a wagoneer, including all power doors and antenna, skid plates, wheels ( if we replace them with something else), interior trim parts and electrics. Once they are killed, they get sold to junkyards or directly for scrap. I think the titles get registered and will not be able to be salvage titles. I guess I'm lucky to be able to save a few parts. And so are several of the other guys that work here who all but stripped all the XJ's and ZJ's we got.

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A WJ? That's pretty high end to be blowing up... I guess they still ain't worth $8g or whatever the dealers are throwing out...

 

 

Edit, can you take engine sensors and electronics? I'd pull EVERY CPS, TPS, IAC, CmPS, ECM and related junk that I could. Throw it all in a rubbermaid tub and you've got spares for a long time. If they really don't care, I'd take the alternators, fuel pumps (the fuel too) and pretty much everything else that was shiny. And the WJ's steering box, that's a little prize...

 

I'm not the type of person to be left alone with a vehicle and told "Help yourself, it's all free". Maybe my windshield wiper motor will never go bad, but I've got two spares just in case!

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Are you allowed to pull parts out of the cars?

Where do the cars go once you kill them?

I saw a couple at the local Pick-N-Pull, they had CARS stickers on them and signs that said no engine part could be sold.

 

And how is that going to work? On the good faith of the junkyard? What are the junkyards to do with the pile of vehicles that have engines that they can't sell parts off?

 

Maybe things are a little different in other places, but here junkyards are what I'd consider 'semi-legit' businesses at best. Cash gets you a better deal, and nothing isn't for sale. If a junkyard was required to simply crush the vehicle with such an engine, I can guarantee there would only be the major components left on that engine when it was crushed, unless there was a government appointed inspector standing there when they did the crushing to ensure everything was still 100% intact.

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The dealer is required to drain the oil and then add sodium silicate to the crank case before running the engine. It will mess up the engine so badly it cannot feasibly be rebuilt.

 

I know, but I'd like to tear one down just to see how bad and specifically what kind of damage gets done...just out of curiosity. Not to re build it though.

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The only clunker I've done so far is a Astro Van. The dealer GM pulled it outside and just punched the throttle. Threw a piston threw the hood, and destroyed the drivers side seat :brows: . He had to go change his drawers. :rotf:

 

 

According to the rules to blow them up, you are not supposed to run the engine more than 2000 RPM while going through the procedure. I'm sure that was meant to avoid throwing pistons through the hood or into the driver seat. Someones gonna get hurt, and the govmnt aint gonna take responsibilty, having set the rules for safety sake. People are frickin stupid!

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According to the rules to blow them up, you are not supposed to run the engine more than 2000 RPM while going through the procedure. I'm sure that was meant to avoid throwing pistons through the hood or into the driver seat.

 

I don't think it was the piston that messed up the driver's seat. What ruined the driver's seat was probably the same thing that made the gm have to change his drawers :rotf:

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I just don't get it, maybe because I'm from the other side of the atlantic, but no matter how much I try to look at it from this side or the other side I simply can not understand the purpose of a program like the CFC????? No one on this planet can convince me that its better for the enviroment/economy to destroy a car that might have 10-20 years left compared to the total cost of producing, distributing and selling a brand new car (that would probably last only half as long as the jeep's we like)

 

I'm getting a little worried at the moment, for the past few months I have have read in the newspapers how "great success" the CFS program have been in the US and how the politicans wants to do something similar over here :fs1:

Rant off and sorry for the :hijack:

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Actually, has Germany not had a program like it in the past?

 

It is horrible for the environment; the best thing you can do to the environment is keep old clunkers on the road as long as possible and produce less new cars.

 

But our economy is in the toilet, and car manufacturers got hit extremely hard, with indirect results throughout the entire economy. This program is meant to sell more new cars to help the auto makers, and in the process help the steel industry as well as companies producing all the little car parts like weather seals, light bulbs, gas tanks, tires etc. and keep people working making money. This program is about trying to help the economy recover; screw the environmental issues it creates.

 

Did it help? Probably. Did it help enough? Probably not. Is this the right way to do it? Not in my opinion.

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Actually, has Germany not had a program like it in the past?

 

 

 

Japan has had a 'similar' program for a long time. I don't know the details, but you only see knew vehicles there for a reason. They don't destroy them, just make the insurance such a hassle/high price that nobody does it... So they get exported to elsewhere now.

 

 

Oh, and I seriously doubt sodium silicate could render an engine unfit for rebuild. If it binds to wear surfaces, machine it off... Pretty fawking simple. People take spun cranks and machine them down all the time, it's not a new concept. Same goes for cams, valve guides, etc.

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Oh, and I seriously doubt sodium silicate could render an engine unfit for rebuild. If it binds to wear surfaces, machine it off... Pretty fawking simple. People take spun cranks and machine them down all the time, it's not a new concept. Same goes for cams, valve guides, etc.

 

But won't it fill up the oil passages?

Rob L.

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Oh, and I seriously doubt sodium silicate could render an engine unfit for rebuild. If it binds to wear surfaces, machine it off... Pretty fawking simple. People take spun cranks and machine them down all the time, it's not a new concept. Same goes for cams, valve guides, etc.

 

But won't it fill up the oil passages?

Rob L.

 

 

I doubt it would bake in, I think it'd only get hot enough to solidify on the actual bearing surfaces... It would be something to try out I guess. But I'm sure there would be a process that could remove it if it did.

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But it solidifies as it cools... I think it would ruin an engine... To the point of no return. At the point of machining, drilling, overworking... would it be worth it?

 

Rob L.

 

 

I'm imagining like any government sponsored program, they have failed to do their homework. I don't see any specific references to easily removing the product of it being heated, but I imagine there is a simple enough process. Acid hot tanking perhaps? It does an amazing job on other deposits and should be done at rebuild anyways...

 

I guess it transforms at 210*~ F. Which is fairly low. The engines that actually ran for a while instead of instantly seizing would probably have a lot greater issues than the ones that went for 5-10 seconds and died. That amount of run time isn't going to heat the entire block that hot.

 

I'm sure time will tell. Somebody is going to try it.

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There is a 2000 XJ in a Kansas City area yard with a seized up motor. The owner says he has 180 days to part it then it must be crushed. Perhaps that is their requirement not the governments? I called and asked if I could buy the entire Jeep just for "parts" for my MJ. Even told him what I am after for a donor. He said I could buy all the parts individually, but he could NOT sell me the entire vehicle as parts.

 

Its a darn shame.

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