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8.8 Ford axle


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Is this what's considered a 9"axle? There's one close to me for sale for $250 with 4.10 gears. It's outta an explorer.

Would it fit under the Comanche with minimal fuss and do ya think it's reasonably priced? It has 31 spline axles and is a non-posi and is out of a 1999 ford model year.

 

No, the 9" is the ford 9" rear end, which is setup differrent than the 8.8".

 

I have a similar rear in my truck, it was a very easy install if you can weld a bit. The only downside is that this rear is like 1" narrower overall than the stock d35, so you may need wheel spacers. I don't, but I'd like to space out a bit.

 

250 is a reasonable price if it's mint condition, with the full disc setup and all. I paid 150 for mine, but I knew the jyard owner.

 

And it is a limited slip, though ford calls it trac-lok instead of posi. If it's worn out, its an easy easy rebuild.

 

Hope that helped.

Matt

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Since we're on the topic I'll copy/paste info I posted about the 8.8" in a recent thread on GLXJ comparing the 8.8" to the D44.

 

The Ford 8.8" has 1.31" 31 spline axle shafts. It however is a C-Clip shaft. which means that the axle shaft is held in place by c-clips at the differential, not by an outer axle flange. If your axle shaft breaks, your wheel will come off.

 

It does have a larger 3.25" tube, however it does neck down to 2.75" just before they enter the brake housings. Rather than welding the tubes on the 8.8 into the diff housing, the tubes are just held in with pressed-in plugs. These plugs tend to stop doing their job under severe stress.

 

The ring gear is larger in the 8.8", however the carrier is known to be a piece of crap and fail.

 

The biggest advantage the 8.8" has is that it has disc brakes from the factory.

 

The width of the 8.8" is 1" shorter, so to be the correct WMS you'll need to run 1/2" spacers on each side in the rear.

 

Also, the 8.8" is NOT a bolt in application for the XJ/MJ, so you will need to purchase a 8.8" install kit that consist of new spring perches that need to be welded onto the tubes.

 

Some argue that since the 8.8" is a semi-floating axle that the c-clips make a big difference. Some argue that they don't.

 

A semi-floating rear axle is one in which the axle shaft does bear some of the vehicle's weight. So in addition to tortional loads, it is required to stand up to shear loads as well.

 

My opinion is that C-clips do make a difference in axle strength. If the axle isn't a full floater, then the stress is spread out across the axle shaft. The axle shaft rides on the outter bearings at the axle tube end and the side gears. The axle shafts neck down at the c-clip and those can break.

 

The other side of the argument is that the c-clips are located inboard of the splines the c-clip portion of the shaft is not exposed to much (if any) torsional or shear loads.

 

Who's right? I don't know....

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I've had the pro/con C-clip discussion on other sites before and now my only opinion on the matter is that, if you can't break it, than it won't matter. Explorer axle shaft breakage is so utterly rare that it simply shouldn't be a concern. And to this date I've never heard of a C-clip failure. The relative weak links in the 8.8 are the carrier and the wussy weld plugs between the axle tube and the center section. Get the tubes welded all the way round and swap in a Detroit or other locker that replaces the carrier and it's practically indestructible for reasonable V8s running up to 37" tires. For those of us running stock 4.0s and up to 33s, the stock carrier is ok. Not great, but ok. (I personally would still get the tubes welded).

 

And for what it's worth, my plan (when I was going to swap an 8.8 into my 90 but then decided to use my Dana 44) was to buy a single 2" spacer and put it on the passenger side. Then center the WMS to WMS and burn on the perches. It centers the pinion (although this isn't really a concern, just a by-product) and means I don't need to do anything about shorter lugs on the shafts (which are longer than 1").

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I don't know if a 2" spacer would be a good thing. I run 1.5" spacers on the back of the Suburban, and it causes the wheels to be visibly turned out because of the spacers giving a little under the weight of the truck. For this reason I temporarily removed them when I was towing a bobcat and when I had 68 4x10 sheets of drywall in the back at 88 pounds each (yes, they did stick out 2' in the back, I only have an 8' load floor. Then I put them back in because I like the look, and really like the added stability.

 

Then again, a Comanche doesn't weigh nearly as much as a Suburban (it's dry weight is 6100 pounds), especially at the rear wheels, so it may not be an issue.

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With spacers you just need to make sure that they are hub-centric and that your rims than match your spacers.

 

If your spacer is not hub-centric they make centering rings out of plastic that you put between the spacer and the rim to center them. Not the best thing but a lot better than just bolting it up.

 

Porsche has been using spacers from the factory for years. I've ran spacers on my BMW racecars for years without issues. Just make sure you get hub-centric ones though and you won't run into any issues.

 

Another option is to run 2 different offset rims (front vs. back). With for instance the Crager Soft 8's they are available in the same size in 2 different offsets. Some guys do this and your able to get very close to the same track width.

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Another option is to run 2 different offset rims (front vs. back). With for instance the Crager Soft 8's they are available in the same size in 2 different offsets. Some guys do this and your able to get very close to the same track width.

 

I think I'm gonna do this on mine. I mean the wheels are 30 bucks each, why not.

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When I did the 8.8 swap in my truck, I offset the axle so the WMS on the drivers side was where the stock axle was and I put a single 1.25" spacer on the right side. This put the wheels back to the stock location and brought the drive shaft closer to the original center line.

I have had no issues with this setup. I did the swap last July so I have about a year running it and love the extra stopping power of 4 wheel disk brakes.

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The only thing I ran into was a slight rubbing problem with the Canyon wheels and a poor caliper casting. I had to smooth the casting on the caliper with a grinder to prevent it from rubbing on the inside edge of the wheel. I'm not sure if any one else has had this problem or not but the fix was simple.

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It however is a C-Clip shaft. which means that the axle shaft is held in place by c-clips at the differential, not by an outer axle flange. If your axle shaft breaks, your wheel will come off.

 

If you have drum brakes. With disc brakes the caliper should hold it together for a short distance, as in getting it off the trail.

 

The relative weak links in the 8.8 are the carrier and the wussy weld plugs between the axle tube and the center section. Get the tubes welded all the way round and swap in a Detroit or other locker that replaces the carrier and it's practically indestructible for reasonable V8s running up to 37" tires. For those of us running stock 4.0s and up to 33s, the stock carrier is ok. Not great, but ok. (I personally would still get the tubes welded).

 

Is the center section cast on the 8.8? Are there any issues or special precautions such as slowly heating and cooling it that are necessary when welding the tubes to it?

 

Willy

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Is the center section cast on the 8.8? Are there any issues or special precautions such as slowly heating and cooling it that are necessary when welding the tubes to it?

 

Willy

 

The center is indeed cast steel. And the answer to your question depends on who you ask. Some say to pre-heat, others say it's not necessary. :dunno: Either way, you probably won't need to weld the entire circumference. Just a few inch-long stitch welds should do fine.

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The only thing I ran into was a slight rubbing problem with the Canyon wheels and a poor caliper casting. I had to smooth the casting on the caliper with a grinder to prevent it from rubbing on the inside edge of the wheel. I'm not sure if any one else has had this problem or not but the fix was simple.

 

I had a bad rubbing problem trying to use some Canyon wheels with my Teraflex rear calipers (Ford Explorer). There was no way I could grind enough off the caliper casting to use the wheels. But the OEM Ravine wheels had plenty of clearance w. no grinding required. I guess all alloy OEM wheels are not created equally even if they are for the same models.

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I ran a 8.8 in Pong on 35's for a lil while. I am going to give my opinion on the whole setup.

 

Buy a set of cutom made perches, that are longer then stock. Helps with antiwrap. BUy a Blue Torch fab or similar beefy cover cause the stock one does not like abuse. I used Spider Trax wheel spacers on Both sides.. no issues with balancing, or wobbling. Use spring plates from a full size ford... Buy your u-bolts from the dealer... they are special. You can switch the companion flange from the explorer over to a u-bolt design yoke( I don't think it protects the u-joint as well or is as strong the companion flange though.

 

 

XJ craxy....

 

I have to ask you whose kit did you use? What was the circumstances that you broke it... where you doing burnouts on the asphalt, or shock loading you axle?

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I used superior's kit. I had just turned onto a road that was a steep incline and the road was wet. As i progressed up the hill the rear axle wheel hopped on me and then i heard it snap.

 

This post is in no way trying to be negative against superior's product.

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I was just wondering.. cause I did hard long burn outs on stock axle shafts and had no issue :nuts: That and I figured it had to be their kit.

 

 

As for welding the center section.... to properly weld cast you need High nickel rod. The housing should be heated. This is done for two reasons.. one to burn off containaments (sp) and to align the metal molecules. Cooling should also be done slowly. Some even wrap it with fire proof insulation to slow the cooling process even more

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Manufacturing defect I guess. :hmm:

I know of one other guy who broke a Superior shaft and called them up and got it replaced. Same thing as yours as it was a very clean break.

 

On my TJ 8.8 we welded the center section and never had one issue. Just a couple of stitch welds on either side. I also agree about the diff cover and run a SOLID cover.

 

I don't like the idea of running one spacer on the axle. I run 3.75"bs wheels and had no issues on my TJ and don't expect any on my MJ.

 

Does anyone know what the measurements are from the center section for the axle perches? My 8.8 should be ready to go in next week.

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