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Jeep Diesel Pickup


skimore11
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But thats how the first jeep became a consumor vehicle originally. So now that its being made we might see it go to a lighter duty civilian version. Hell they can't say its not feasible to make cause they are already making. The only issue is going to be competition with the dakota?? We now have a little hope guys

 

Cole

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That may be a Jeep but it sure ain't no pickup and unless they can do better than the Liberty diesel on milage they won't sell many. I just put 320 miles on the old 86 Renault Comanche with 210,000 miles on it this weekend on one trip and it took exactly 9 gallons of fuel to fill it up afterwords. It's got 4.10 gears and factory tires so it runs about 2800 rpm at 55mph so it is not geared for milage. It has a small crack in one of the precombustion chambers so I have to keep the boost gauge down at about 5psi or less to keep the coolant in it. When it was right and I could run the boost up at 10 psi or more it was more efficient and I have gotten as high as 38mpg in the past. With modern diesel technology there is no reason a Comanche sized pickup couldn't get 40+mpg if they would just build one. They are available in Europe, South America and I'm sure many other places but they just can't seem to find a way to give people in ths country a decent small pickup that will get good milage. If Chrysler or whoever owns Jeep now doesn't quit messing around with it they will be having problems soon.

 

opsled

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don't brag old man.... :eek:

 

I may have to give you a different comanche soon so I can get that there diesel off your hands. :P

 

 

anywho, I like the conceptual idea, but it really has no application in warfare. there's no way I'd go to war with no top/soft top and little armour...

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The American ppl as a whole have never really adopted the diesel family for several reason. Mostly the bad performance when some automakers tried to intorduce them in the late 70's and early 80's. Also diesel up till recently was always more then gas... now the roles have changed.

 

The other down side has always been they are loud... blow black smoke and just never caught on.

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The American ppl as a whole have never really adopted the diesel family for several reason. Mostly the bad performance when some automakers tried to intorduce them in the late 70's and early 80's. Also diesel up till recently was always more then gas... now the roles have changed.

 

The other down side has always been they are loud... blow black smoke and just never caught on.

 

Yea, those TWO stink fest of GM's pretty much torpedoed any chances that diesel ever had for pax cars in the US.

 

I had a 79 Mercury Lynx(Escort clone with nice seats) that had a 1.9L diesel in it. It had to sit for almost 3 minutes for the glow plugs to warm things up enough in the winter to start her. It used to piss people I worked with off to find out that I used to leave it run for 4 hour shifts, and I still only used about 12 gallons of fuel a week(70 mile round trip daily, and leaving it running every nite).

 

Not to mention opening the hood to be able to use the ether injection system. I wish I could have kept that car from rusting out....

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Also diesel up till recently was always more then gas... now the roles have changed.

Your age (or lack thereof) is showing.

 

Diesel fuel in the U.S. historically was always considerably less expensive than gasoline ... up until the recent, artificially manufactured gasoline "shortages" when they arbitrarily pushed the price of diesel higher than the cost of gasoline purely as a way of preventing the market from demanding diesel powered cars and light trucks that Detroit doesn't want to produce for us.

 

And the added cost isn't due to having to use low-sulpher fuel. My wife is from Chile and they have a LOT of diesel cars and light trucks down there. They also have stricter emissions rules than the US, because Santiago holds half the population of the entire country and has a huge smog problem. Diesel down there typically runs at least 25 percent less than regular gasoline. The diesel Liberty (which is sold as the "Cherokee" down there) is very popular.

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I am in my mid thirties... and I am trying to think back.. and I am almost positive for the lat 10-15 yrs diesel being more expensive... but I could be wrong.

 

 

The other down side to a diesel is the fact that they are so much higher in intial buy in price.

 

 

All that being said... my next tow rig will be a diesel :D

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I am in my mid thirties... and I am trying to think back.. and I am almost positive for the lat 10-15 yrs diesel being more expensive... but I could be wrong.

 

 

The other down side to a diesel is the fact that they are so much higher in intial buy in price.

 

 

All that being said... my next tow rig will be a diesel :D

 

Maybe where you are. But here in Midwest farm country, we have experienced exactly what Eagle said. Cheaper until just the last couple of years.

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The other down side to a diesel is the fact that they are so much higher in intial buy in price.

 

All that being said... my next tow rig will be a diesel :D

 

the F250 diesel engine is a 6900$ upgrade. :eek: and it also adds like 700 pounds

 

not worth buyin the truck if it's not diesel though so i wouldn't blink twice.

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with eagle on the diesel gas prices and Oizarod115 why would you get a ford? they circled the problem not the solution

 

I work for an International dealer and not one tech would buy a Ford pick-up with the VT-365 diesel engine. They would buy the old 7.3, but the new engines are junk.

 

They all say a Dodge with the Cummins is the way to go. The Chevy rates second and the Ford is a no go...

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I am in my mid thirties... and I am trying to think back.. and I am almost positive for the lat 10-15 yrs diesel being more expensive... but I could be wrong.

As I said, your lack of age is showing. :D

 

10 or 15 years is "recent," not "always." I started driving in the late 50's and high test gasoline was around 20 cents/gallon. The first artificial gas shortage was in 1973 (IIRC), and it was about then that the price of diesel mysteriously overtook the price of gasoline. Back then Volkswagen, Mercedes, Peugeot, and even Oldsmobile had diesel-powered automobiles, and the gas companies didn't want any part of vehicles that got 40 MPG on cheap fuel, so they put the brakes on it. They pushed the price up until a diesel Rabbit wasn't economically viable, and VW dropped the option in the U.S. Mercedes also stopped importing diesel cars for a long time, but nowhere near as long as VW, which just started bringing in diesels again a couple of years ago.

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with eagle on the diesel gas prices and Oizarod115 why would you get a ford? they circled the problem not the solution

 

I work for an International dealer and not one tech would buy a Ford pick-up with the VT-365 diesel engine. They would buy the old 7.3, but the new engines are junk.

 

They all say a Dodge with the Cummins is the way to go. The Chevy rates second and the Ford is a no go...

 

whats so bad about them? only thing i've heard is the whole flame-shooting incident.

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well, basically they're over-technical pieces of junk.

 

all electronic controlled.

 

to get to the glow plugs or injectors you basically have to disassemble the entire top of the engine, and to get to the top of the engine, you basically have to yank it. they're trying to shove the engines farther in to save on length of the vehicle. repairs are frequently needed due to poor engineering, and said repairs are difficulet due to what I just outlined

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to get to the glow plugs or injectors you basically have to disassemble the entire top of the engine, and to get to the top of the engine, you basically have to yank it. they're trying to shove the engines farther in to save on length of the vehicle. repairs are frequently needed due to poor engineering, and said repairs are difficulet due to what I just outlined

 

jamminz.gif powertrain warranty. :brows:

 

its really not practical to drive a vehicle that expensive until you pay it off anyways, you'd end up losing alot of money. but yeah, from lookin under the hood i can see how workin on one might be a complete PITA.

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with eagle on the diesel gas prices and Oizarod115 why would you get a ford? they circled the problem not the solution

 

I work for an International dealer and not one tech would buy a Ford pick-up with the VT-365 diesel engine. They would buy the old 7.3, but the new engines are junk.

 

They all say a Dodge with the Cummins is the way to go. The Chevy rates second and the Ford is a no go...

 

whats so bad about them? only thing i've heard is the whole flame-shooting incident.

 

They eat turbos, blow head gaskets and are just under built. They aren't a real medium duty engine. They are pushing the engine to the max stock.

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I work for an International dealer and not one tech would buy a Ford pick-up with the VT-365 diesel engine. They would buy the old 7.3, but the new engines are junk.

 

They all say a Dodge with the Cummins is the way to go. The Chevy rates second and the Ford is a no go...

But on the other hand ... the mother and step-father of a Jeeping friend of mine recently bought a Dodge diesel crew cab to haul their 30-foot 5th wheel trailer. Then they discovered that the Dodge 2500 isn't rated to carry/tow that much weight, so they sold the Dodge and bought a Ford. According to my friend, the Ford carries a much higher load capacity than a Dodge of "comparable" series.

 

Anybody know if this is true?

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I work for an International dealer and not one tech would buy a Ford pick-up with the VT-365 diesel engine. They would buy the old 7.3, but the new engines are junk.

 

They all say a Dodge with the Cummins is the way to go. The Chevy rates second and the Ford is a no go...

But on the other hand ... the mother and step-father of a Jeeping friend of mine recently bought a Dodge diesel crew cab to haul their 30-foot 5th wheel trailer. Then they discovered that the Dodge 2500 isn't rated to carry/tow that much weight, so they sold the Dodge and bought a Ford. According to my friend, the Ford carries a much higher load capacity than a Dodge of "comparable" series.

 

Anybody know if this is true?

 

The 2500 Dodge trucks max weight rating is determined by the tires. They are what sets the limit. Ford uses a bigger tire that can haul more weight. Why didn't they buy a dually 1 ton? They bought the heavest combo they could(a crew cab diesel) which lowers its ratings. Ford F-250 and F-350 both use the same rear springs, it's all about the tires and how much the truck wieghs. The Ford/International engine is light when compared to the Dodge/Cummins combo.

 

A 30-foot 5th wheel trailer is meant to be pulled with a DRW 1 ton.

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