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Winch question


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whats a good winch to go with for a comanche?

 

4000lb

6000lb

8000lb

 

 

I'm going to aka custom bumper here this spring fir it and i want a winch, i don't want over kill just enough to give a good tug if I'm saddle bagged. and really stuck i was thinking of going with a 6000lb winch sound good?

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A 6K should be adequate for a MJ. My personal rule is the winch capability should be twice the wt of the load to be pulled. Don't forget a pulley block and a tree strap.

 

By that rule, he should go with an 8k. A mildly built 4wd 4.0 MJ with driver should easily hit the 4,000lb mark.

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I based my answer on the fact that he keeps his tires properly inflated, which as we all know effects rolling resistance.Exception; If your high centered on a tree stump.

:typing:

 

usually the only time when a winch is used is when you are stuck. tire psi has nothing to do with it.

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8k lbs is definitely minimum for a jeep.

 

that weight rating is only for the first wrap of cable, so when the cable is fully extended (less leverage) it's actually got significantly less than 8k lbs

 

I thought you had more leverage with the cable fully unspooled (keeping the proper amount cable on the drum of course). Thats the first wrap of cable.

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so 8k is the recommended size .. well if you had a 6000lb winch and double backed with a pulley it would pull the jeep out with half the effort. and if your triple pulley it you can do it by hand i seen that done on dirty jobs on discovery channel they pulled a stuck hummer h2 out by hand by a pulley system but i think they had like 6 or 8 lines through the pulley system

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so 8k is the recommended size .. well if you had a 6000lb winch and double backed with a pulley it would pull the jeep out with half the effort. and if your triple pulley it you can do it by hand i seen that done on dirty jobs on discovery channel they pulled a stuck hummer h2 out by hand by a pulley system but i think they had like 6 or 8 lines through the pulley system

 

It all depends on the angle on the winch line. Less than a certain amount and the pulling force isn't quite as multiplied(a pully is a 'simple machine' in scientific terms - one of the six simple machines we use daily to get work done). Always carry at least _2_ snatch blocks with you - you can attach a block to the casualty vehicle to even out the load and modify or steady the angle you are pulling from. Always try to keep your line from spaghetti-ing(it will last much longer and have more pulling strength). Make sure you know how many strands your winch line has, and how much load you lose per strand if it frays in use(because, sooner or later, it will). Etc etc.

 

Get the most powerful winch you can safely fit to your vehicle. Every pound of capacity it has over the required load is your safety factor. There is no such thing as having too much winch.

 

Here's some of my cheat sheets I have from doing recovery work in Ireland and England:

 

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I have seen people use a purple AKA violet sling to slingshot a 4X4 with(which is not a good idea in the first place since sling-shotting means you have no idea how much strain the line is under unless you do the math for the acceleration of the vehicle as this adds to the force significantly vs a static winch line). It is only rated at 1 ton. If you follow the cheat sheets and do the simple math, you can see that one can get into a lot of trouble unless it is a significantly higher rated strap(and color guidelines are not necessary hard and fast - so read the rating).

 

And you guys thought all us recovery guys were jis meth addicted punks ;)

 

Know your equipment, and know how to use it. BE SAFE!

 

WYK

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Thats stated backwards, fully extended gives you full pull power. the less exteneded the cable the less power.

 

8k lbs is definitely minimum for a jeep.

 

that weight rating is only for the first wrap of cable, so when the cable is fully extended (less leverage) it's actually got significantly less than 8k lbs

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Thats stated backwards, fully extended gives you full pull power. the less exteneded the cable the less power.

 

8k lbs is definitely minimum for a jeep.

 

that weight rating is only for the first wrap of cable, so when the cable is fully extended (less leverage) it's actually got significantly less than 8k lbs

 

The reason for this being the same reason you need lower gears when you increase your tire size. The further away you are from the center of the spin axis(wheel, winch) the less torque multiplication you have. Also, if you have a snatch block, always use that if you can VS winching directly back to your truck - this gives you more pulling power, is easier on your winch and makes it easier to keep the winch from tangling, and decreases the chances of your damaging the truck if the line or the hook point fail.

 

If you guys have any questions regarding the winch cheat sheets, let me know. A remark I thought might be worth making is the grass in Ireland and England is usually far thicker and provides more rolling resistance than any of ours in the states do. So keep that in mind when using the ground factor chart.

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