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How it's done


Jeep Driver
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I've applied product for years, home and industrial. This isn't my first go-round with automotive but I'm no expert.

I do know a good tint man when I meet him, they are few and far between. 

 

Color matching my interior bits from scratch. He knows his $#!& and this is how it's done. 

 

ackKxLP.jpg

 

He also tinted my paint from scratch back when I stripped down and repainted my little Kubota. 

 

h7PeLFi.jpg

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38 minutes ago, HOrnbrod said:

Is this in reference to a topic or just for general knowledge?  :thinking:

 

 

 

It's called- Planting the Seed of Curiosity. 

I know it's a foreign concept to most people these days, curiosity. 

 

I'm trying to encourage the rattle-canners to step outside themselves. 

 

I'm also pointing to, differentiating from, the knuckle dragger that pushes a button on the tint machine and that of a professional whom I consider an artist. Since most people's experience with tinting product is walking into a Home Gimpo and .........................

 

 

And, since there was a recent inquiry regarding staining/painting interior bits..................

 

I also intended to post pics of a couple of panels I'm spraying today.

 

 

 

...........since you had to ask..................

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I'm curious.

 

I have three vehicles which will need paint at some point within the next couple of years.  I can spray frames and axels all day long and make them look great with my 80 gallon compressor and a cheap HVLP gun, but have no confidence in my ability or equipment to do any exterior panels at any acceptable level.

 

I think you were in my spot until you got a much better paint gun, right?  

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1 hour ago, HOrnbrod said:

What's with all the spaces.........................................

 

and dots?

...............................................

 

For emphasis?

......................................

 

:confused:

 

 

 

It's how people speak. 

 

Some things are not worth typing..........rambling, continuation of though, I expect you to know where I'm going with it. 

 

 

 

 

And, I'm really shocked at your line questions, at your lack of thought and curiosity. 

 

Do you know how paint is tinted?

So, lets assume that Wayne is close to what I call Camel color of my interior but the color has a pink hue/shade, do you know what color tint is used to cancel out the pink?

That's how it works, you not only add color but you cancel out color.

And you are not the least bit curious. 

 

Not mention that most men, if not 99% of men, if they are not color blind, they are certainly blind to shades of hues (such as a shade of pink or a shade of green). 

 

Generally, I'm in awe of people who can do things that I cannot do. Apparently, you are not, wonder if you give anyone credit for anything?

 

 

 

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And further............

 

 Is this not the BS forum?

 

Is this not where anyone can post whatever? 

 

Why are you questioning me? Does it not have a part number or a shop manual reference?

 

Your $#!& gets old. 

 

Maybe you need a new hobby?

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I've only done a little bit with paint.  Waaaayyy back when I was 17, I had a local paint ship mix up some paint to match the camel color in my K5 Blazer, which I then used to paint my "Highliner".  Some of you olden guys might remember them, they mounted your stereo overhead and had 4 speakers in them, and replaced your headliner.

 

I see he is working in the sun, I suppose so he can get a perfect match.  Cool.

18 Jan K5 (1).JPG

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The paint is basecoat, same as used on the exterior under clearcoat. 

The trick is to add hardener, same hardener as used with single stage and clearcoats. 

 

I used 2ml to about 8oz of paint/reducer. The hardener gives the paint a nice soft angular sheen. Hardener is not otherwise added to basecoats. 

 

Paint dries to the touch in about 5 minutes, can be handled safely in 10 minutes. 

 

This Bulldog really works, I used a scratchbrite between coats and could not scuff off the paint. 

 

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To pique your curiosity, let's take a look at what we see. The light you see coming from an object is the remainder, the light the object doesn't absorb. So what is commonly considered an objects color is actually the color it's not. So when you wish to remove the pink light wave, an object which absorbs it but doesn't absorb the desired frequencies needs to be added. 

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14 hours ago, Jeep Driver said:

YiIiwO4.jpg

 

FtYuV9A.jpg

 

P0VbujR.jpg

 

JeepDriver,

 

Did you refinish/paint all 3 items in the above pictures?

 

Good info on  the Bulldog adhesion promoter

 

What finish paint did you use for the plastic items?

 

Asking because I may want to refresh the plastic in my 86 diesel Comanche.

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1 hour ago, johnj92131 said:

 

JeepDriver,

 

Did you refinish/paint all 3 items in the above pictures?

 

Good info on  the Bulldog adhesion promoter

 

What finish paint did you use for the plastic items?

 

Asking because I may want to refresh the plastic in my 86 diesel Comanche.

Yes, all three.

The adhesion promoter is excellent, smells like nothing I've ever used before.......so it must work :P.

I don't have a product number for you, Sherwin Williams basecoat, hardener added. 

 

And clean clean clean, then clean again. I cleaned these panels 4 times, then wiped down areas that I thought might cause problems with lacquer thinner. 

The brand Awesome is a dollar a bottle at Dollar General and is just that, awesome. 

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I'll add this-

 

You won't realize it until you take your interior panels out and actually compare them against each other just how different they are in color.

My dash valance/knee panel was closer to taupe in color, the kick panel was closer to camel color and had an orange tint. 

Also, each panel will fade differently over the years, age, fade, dirt, cannot be color matched. 

 

Once he got the paint color close, somewhere in between the taupe and orange, I asked him to take the orange out...........IOWs the color I wound up with is neither of the two but a compromise. 

The color you see is closer to the taupe family and now that it's applied I like it much better. This should give me more options when I go to the upholster to have the seats done, I should have more color choices in the bone/taupe/tan family of color than in the camel-orange family. 

 

Point is- you have a lot more leeway when doing a custom color than when going to the rattle can rack at the AP store. 

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Lastly- The point of this thread. 

 

I think for myself and I expect others to do so also, apparently this pisses off one or more people here.....how dare you think for yourself?

 

In the vid below, in the intro KC states that he has not done a how-to vid because he 'pushes' his product to the limit. I understand completely what he means when he says 'push' product, I've been doing it for years. IOWs, you can do things with product that it was not necessarily designed for, extending the limits, not by the 'book'.  

This comes from years of experience, knowing what you can do and what you cannot do, and being able to clean up your mess when you make one, fixing your mistakes. 

 

Find the old curmudgeon, the old guy that's been at it for 30-40 years, the guy that's willing to answer your questions, who is willing to impart his years of knowledge and experience, someone who has actually done something in life. 

Experience and knowledge are rare commodities these days. 

 

 

And it's interesting to watch the BASF guy pitch his products.........and knowing that KC must think what a bunch of BS, but I suspect the product was free for grandpa's truck.The big Sata sign, yeah, I bet he get's his $1200 guns for free too. 

 

 

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My dad was a maintenance painter for half of his work life

Also did furniture finishing.  Lots of patience to get things correct.

Always said preparation was the most important thing. I simply never had his patience.

Please see my phone.m

 

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