Jump to content

D35 Leak?!? How serious is this?! HELP!


Recommended Posts

Hey all,

Ive been chasing a noise in my truck today, come to find brake lines laying on the driveshaft?!? Apparently the previous owner thought it would be ok to zip tie them up, and not use the clip fastened to the underside of the bed....Anyway....while I was under there I spotted this....Its not dripping, and there is no "wet spot" on the driveway. The D35 makes absolutely no noise at all. I have no idea how long it has been wet there, and the previous owner said he's never had a problem with the rear end. Should I just keep driving it, and monitor it for any leakage? OR.... :headpop:

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 62
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Yes. I took a second look. The lines that were on top of the drive shaft were fuel lines, and everything else is dry/rusty. It does appear only wet toward the ground. It appears to have been leaking for a while (the whole front of the D35 is pretty caked with grease/dirt) I cleaned up around the u-joint/diff seal with some de-greaser to see how badly its leaking....Grr. I just got rid of one jeep because of a repeat problem with a D35. Grr.

-E.

 

p.s.- no fuel leaks either. (whew)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're blowing a little issue out of proportion. Quit worrying about it so much. Keep an eye on it. If it starts leaking so bad it spots the ground or you pull the plug and the fluid level is down, then replace it. You don't know how to replace a seal? Jeeps are great learning machines. Learn.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim....You are most likely right. I am concerned about the torque on the yoke nut, having read that it is critical to have it just right, or gear failure can happen. How much of this is truth? I can surely do it myself. Ive read the proceedure. I am concerned, as it is my DD and I cannot afford a rear end re-build.

-Erin

p.s.- I will keep an eye on it, and I do have a buddy that may be able to help me out to change out the seal. (I do not have all the tools to do it)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If getting the torque right is your biggest worry, most parts stores have a tool loan program, and you could rent a torque wrench for the job. Usually you just pay for it in full, do the job, and return it for a full refund. Save you the $50 an ok t.w. would cost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a decent Craftsman TW. However, torque specs seem to be a gray area on this?!? In the manual it says to use the TW to remove the nut so you can pay attention to how much torque it takes to remove it, and use the same torque measurement to put the nut back on? I understand it, but it seems a strange way to do things, plus Ive read the pinion nut can be extremely hard to remove without an impact wrench!?! (then how do you find out how much torque?)

 

Aside from that, I have a couple questions....Where do I find:

 

The new seal

A new pinion nut

a new crush washer

 

should I replace the pinion nut and washer?!? There seems to be alot of gray area in what Ive read. Id like to do it the right way, and hopefully only once. Sorry if it seems I'm over thinking it. Just want to get it right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok...I think I found it...Can someone confirm this is correct? 175-190ft Lbs? (I assume this is using the original crush washer) I now under stand measuring the rotating torque to set the nut. Why is this information so scattered?

-Erin

 

Edit!.....OK, a buddy of mine who is an ex mechanic is going to give me a hand changing it out. His advice was also to simply monitor it, and get the seal, and replace when ready. Can anyone confirm how to properly torque the yoke nut back down? AND, whether or not to replace the nut/washer?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

VIA PM:

 

Hey Rob,

There seems to be alot of gray area on how to re-torque the yoke nut. Can you give me any direction here? Sounds like you have done one? The last info I found was, it probably won't come off without an impact wrench (I can rent one) and to simply re-torque the nut to 180ft lbs...and not replace the nut or washer?!? Can you confirm this, or give me the straight scoop?

-Erin

 

Subject: D35 Leak?!? How serious is this?! HELP!

 

Looks like a pinion seal leak. No big deal really. Keep it topped off and watch it until you get a chance to put a new one in.

 

Rob

 

The old school way I was taught was to just count the threads. Find the start of the threads on the pinion shaft, and count how many you can see before the nut. Buzz off the nut by impact, or a big @$$ socket wrench and some chocks to stop it rolling. Get under the old seal with a flat head and hook/pull it out. Clean the surfaces, lightly oil the pinion to assist with sliding the seal over it, slide the new seal over it, and tap it on the outside flange until its seated. Put your yoke back on, and run the nut back down until the same number of threads are showing at your count point.

 

Not scientific by any means, but its worked for me.

Rob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Rob....Thanks! Did you use a torque wrench at all to "set" the nut? Any noise from the rear end? (my big fear) And, how long have you been running on a "new" pinion seal?

 

My concerns come from my last XJ which I eventually sold after 4 rear end rebuilds due to crappy mechanics, and a "lost" car fax explaining the car had been rear ended previously in its life, and rebuilt (this from the dealership) I sold the truck out of frustration as the rear end was never right, even after getting a "new" used rear end. Now you know where my fear comes from.

-Erin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Put 2 referance marks with a center punch, 1 on the yoke and 1 on nut . buzz it off pop the seal out put a little grease on the inside of the new seal to aid in installation and run the nut back till the 2 referance marks line up. Have done many this way and aint had one fail yet. You can do it !!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Guys! I do need the vote of support! I'm going to pick up the seal soon. I did find a buddy to come give me a hand when I do it. Anyone confirm that Ive got 3.55 gears in my truck? Its a 90 2wd 4 speed. No tag on the diff anymore..... :fs1:

 

Edit: Why are there so many guys warning of gear failure if its not done right?!?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gears can be touchy if you get balls deep in them. I would call this procedure more of a "Just the tip" situation. When installing and setting gears, many things have to be right. Backlash, pinion depth, preload... Many specific tools needed for that. You aren't changing any of that though.

 

You don't need a torque wrench either. Do it the way I described, and its not necessary. Just know that when doing it my way, you have to stop at the calculated point. Don't run it down until it stops, or is tight, just to the spot it was before. (Which will still most likely be a bear to tighten back down to.)

 

I would recommend dropping the cover, inspecting the gears for obvious cracks, missing teeth or wear before you get too involved. Good time to change the fluid too. Leave the cover off when your are working on the pinion seal. After everything is back together, clean the cover and the surface, apply a bead of RTV, and put it back on.

 

Bam-zoom.

Rob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Rob. Like I said, I'm just nervous/gun shy because of the last XJ. I have decided to pick up the new seal, and monitor things, and when I'm ready, change it out. My only fear was getting the yoke nut on correctly, and not having noise show up, as I really cannot afford another rebuild.

-E.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You never mention what year your D35 is. If it's a non c-clip axle (1989 and below) the diff uses shims to set preload. So no worries changing out the pinion seal as long as you re-torque the pinion shaft nut back to correct specs. It's probably leaking because the seal has worn a groove in the pinion yoke shaft over time. Sometimes just sanding the shaft smooth and replacing the seal only will cure it, sometimes not. I just replaced the pinion yoke shaft on my D44 with a stronger u-bolt unit along with a new seal and nut. Not a bad job at all.

 

If your D35 comes from a 1990 and up axle it's a c-clip axle. These use a crush sleeve to set preload, so you need to replace that too. These can get hairy to set the preload correctly if you don't know what you are doing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In that case, I'd just watch the fluid level and top off as necessary until it breaks. Then dump the D35 for a better axle. :cheers:

 

Look on the axle tubes for the D35C. The c-clip axles will have this. But the best way is to pull the cover off and look inside. You can see the C-clips on the ends of the axle shafts. Also you can check the gear ratio while you're in there by the ring/pinion gear stampings, or count the teeth on each gear. Dividing the ring gear teeth number by the pinion gear teeth number = the gear ratio.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...