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oils filters revealed!


WBKrazy
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I've been using the Purolater filters. If he redid his study, it may be time to read up again.

 

Me too, but the Ford oversized filter. Interesting reading. It states for the Pur-One that the new filtering medium has been increased and is so dense it may restrict flow. And I did notice an increase in my oil pressure on the last oil change using this filter. Hmmmmm. I think it might be time to go back to the Mobil 1 filter, or maybe a Wix. I'm glad some one takes the time to do these unofficial studies. :cheers:

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I now work as an Engineering Technician for one of the countries largest private automotive filter distributors. We sell to everyone from FRAM, WIX, BALDWIN, PUROLATOR, CHAMP LABS, and all of their sub-companies. We don't sell oil filters to all companies, but have cut open and tested every maufacturers oil filters (spin-on and cartridge).

 

Anyone have questions :brows:

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I now work as an Engineering Technician for one of the countries largest private automotive filter distributors. We sell to everyone from FRAM, WIX, BALDWIN, PUROLATOR, CHAMP LABS, and all of their sub-companies. We don't sell oil filters to all companies, but have cut open and tested every maufacturers oil filters (spin-on and cartridge).

 

Anyone have questions :brows:

 

that is sweet, why don't you post up some general info, tell us if you agree with the study. i've been using wix filters, fram do seem like junk to me i stopped using them, you can feel a weight difference just by holding them.

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We do not sell oil filters to FRAM. We only sell our in house brand of oil filters: Service Pro. Our biggest customer for oil filters is AIOD (Association of Indipendent Oil Distributor) Jiffy Lubes, smaller dealerships, etc. We are also working on NAPA filters (shhhhhhhhh)

 

 

But Fram oil filters are junk. They use a weaker media, and fabric endcaps. They also use a leaf spring retainer, which is weaker than our hardened coild spring retainer. Our filters also have a thicker can that resists denting, etc.

 

That being said....I am an Engineer, not a sales person. After seeing our filters flow tested and burst tested, I would not hesitate to use them on any of my vehicles. However, you can't buy Serivce Pro filters in stores. So....

 

I WOULD CHOOSE WIX FILTERS HANDS DOWN over any other oil filter out there. Wix has incredible quality control at both their factories, and their production inspections. Wix also has one of the toughest filters that can be abused and still work, and they take pride in that as a company.

 

Other things to consider are pressure relief valves...these are important if your filter becomes clogged. It can commonly be overlooked by manufacturers, as it is a safety and not a required design element. I have seen many cases of filters over pressurizing, and blowing the gasket out, causing a leak.

 

BTW...burst testing is cool!! I just built a new hand pump for testing spin-ons. What a sweet rig. Makes a mess when they blow at 300psi :cheers:

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Eagle:

 

1. Just how bad ARE Fram filters?

 

Fram filters work. They do what they are supposed to. I wouldn't want to miss an oil change with one though. The fabric endcaps that hold the media together are obviously not as strong as metal ones. These can break down over time, causing the media to break apart and enter your engine...especially when the filter is dirty and has more of a restriction to flow.

 

2. How good or bad are the standard (not the Pur-One) Purolator filters?

 

Purolator has had good quality filters in the past. Slightly thinner can usually, but more or less a good filter. I would run a Purolator filter on my rig after seeing the inside. Not sure about this "new media" mentioned before...I will try to do some investigating if things slow down this week.

 

3. Which filters have effective anti-drainback valves, and which don't?

 

Anti-drain back valves are idiot proof to manufacture. They are essentially rubber flaps that keep oil in the 'clean' side of the filter. This prevents engine from starting with no oil in the filter. On most domestic vehicles where oil filter are mounted low on the block/sideways, this isn't a problem. When auto manufacturers started putting spin-ons in strange orientations, ADBV's became necessary. They were moved to other part numbers as a sales pitch mostly. I'd say over 80% of vehicles see no benefit from ADBV's

 

Try this next time you change your oil: After you remove your old oil filter, let it sit upside for an hour or so. Then holding it upside down, poke the rubber flap thru one of the holes and watch the oil come out. SEE! Not empty!

 

Hope that answers your questions Eagle.

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Hope that answers your questions Eagle.

Thanks for trying, but it actually doesn't answer any of my questions very well.

 

1. We KNOW that Fram filters cause low oil pressure on the Jeep engines. This has been documented right here. Virtually every time someone posts that they have low (or no) oil pressure, we ask if they are running a Fram filter and the answer is almost always yes. They change the filter and the problem goes away. This is fact, not theory. The question is: Why?

 

2. The new media referred to for Purolator was said to be in the Pure-One filters. I run the standard Purolators. That's why I specifically asked about the standard, NOT the Pur-One, filters.

 

3. The Renix 4.0L engines mount the filter upside down, which makes an anti-drainback valve mandatory. Whether or not they all have them, some seem to work (Purolator) and some seem to not work (if they have them), such as Fram. Perhaps I should have asked which filters have useful anti-drainback valves rather than just ask which have them.

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Hope that answers your questions Eagle.

Thanks for trying, but it actually doesn't answer any of my questions very well.

 

1. We KNOW that Fram filters cause low oil pressure on the Jeep engines. This has been documented right here. Virtually every time someone posts that they have low (or no) oil pressure, we ask if they are running a Fram filter and the answer is almost always yes. They change the filter and the problem goes away. This is fact, not theory. The question is: Why?

 

2. The new media referred to for Purolator was said to be in the Pure-One filters. I run the standard Purolators. That's why I specifically asked about the standard, NOT the Pur-One, filters.

 

3. The Renix 4.0L engines mount the filter upside down, which makes an anti-drainback valve mandatory. Whether or not they all have them, some seem to work (Purolator) and some seem to not work (if they have them), such as Fram. Perhaps I should have asked which filters have useful anti-drainback valves rather than just ask which have them.

 

 

 

Eagle-

 

At work now with my data in front of me, let me see if I can do better.

 

The FRAM issue: Renix motors call for a PH3985. I do not have testing data for this filter. I DO have data for the PH16 used on newer Jeeps/Chryslers.

 

FRAM PH16

Mile Grand mo16

U.S.A

20um 99.50%

50um 99.70%

Test length 0:56:59

Retained capacity 6.748g

 

While we don not have flow restriction numbers (we do not supply this filter to Fram), I can conclude that a filter that is 99.5% efficient at 20 microns will have a significant restriction to flow in order to trap all of those particles. Especially towards the end of the filter's service life.

 

 

Anti-drain back valves: Some companies such as Honeywell (Fram, Micro Gard, Defense) have been known to use Nitrile Butadiene Rubber with a shore hardness as high as 70-75%%D. This results in the rubber becoming brittle, more so when the product has sat on the shelf for a long time. Good anti-drain back valves are made of a softer NBR to allow them to conform to the base plate and remain resilient.

 

KEEP IN MIND: It is impossible to state that this data is accurate for all part numbers of a certain brand. Purolator for instance buys only a handful of part numbers from us, starting just recently. There are three different factories that supply those part numbers. That being said, most company who DO NOT manufacture their own filters will have a variety of filter types in their line. They approve filters one part number at a time, and the sources vary accordingly. Companies also change suppliers faster than I change socks. It is impossible to give data and opinions of a whole line of filters. The original link is a great resource for PH8A filters, but cannot be held true for all filters. There is just too much variation. I won't even get into spot buys and cross vendor purchasing.

 

This is why I personally stick with WIX. WIX makes WIX oil filters. Period.

 

I cannot stress enough how vague the filter industry can be. Inspect your oil filters before you put them on. Make damn sure you are comfortable putting them on your vehicle. Check the threads if you can. Check the gasket, check for perpendicularity, look inside the filter, look for foreign materials or excess media.

 

Lunch is just about over, so I'm going back CAD work. I will try to answer any more questions tonight.

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