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shock mounts for SOA


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What did all you SOA guys do for axle shock mounts? I've seen the weld-on mounts (RE, JKS, et al) but I know the fab skills of the group and am looking for a homebrew version.

 

I've also seen someone on here use the MJ plates flipped upside down and side to side to mount the shock aboved the axle. Does that work good? I tried to figure out the amount of body lift (which would raise the upper mount) compared to the higher position of the mount, and it seems to be about equal (??), so could you still use the stock length shocks if you did that?

 

Last thing I need to figure out before I put the axle underneath...hopefully this weekend.

 

Thanks,

Jeff

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here's what I did on the dana 44.

 

I also had one that was a flip-over style like you're talking about on the junk 86, and it's crappy. the shocks don't flex correctly.

 

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anyways, that worked out good...it allows me to retain stock rear shocks and works out very well. no high $$$ spent on new shocks

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This is what I did. I used a set of trailer perches from Harbor Freight and welded a bolt to it and called it good. I think they were like $10 for the pair and the bolts was like a buck so for less then $15. Also if you do this you will need to figure out how to mount them to the upper part of the frame I used some 3" channel because it was lying around. I got this ideal from CW project (he used angle) if you look thru there you find the way he did his.

 

 

 

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i think pete done a good write up on it in another thread on this topic. I had mentioned in it using the stock plate and flipping it over and swapping sides with it. It worked good and i have 0 bind issues and i havent had them bottom or over extend at flex. I can take pics if you would like.

 

Cole

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Yes flipping the plates over, notching and swapping sides allows you to run stock shocks ( nice and soft with good articulation) down side is the stamped steel jeep used to make the plates is not the best quality and if modified you will find the weakness quickly. I have now broken the left rear plat twice. We welded it back together and it broke about a 1/4" away from the welded part.

 

My dad is fabricating a new design from 5/16" plate now to replace both. I will post the picks and details for eveyone as soon as we are done this method will require minimal welding and not break, plus this will make eagle feel better that we are not destroying all of those original parts.

 

If it ain't broke, break it then fix it!

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I put an XJ axle in mine and didn't cut off the extraneous brackets. I drilled a hole in the side of the one on the driver's side and stuck the bolt in there. Ran that way for quite awhile, then I got a weld on mount for the passenger's side. Still stock mounted on top.

I have a pair of shock mounts (actually swaybar plates) that bolt between the axle and springs on the SOA that will allow stock shock mounting too. A smidge more lift as a bonus too!

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I forgot to mention that mine werent cut and don't need to be. I know someone mentioned they had to cut theres but i don't see why. They may have done it differently. This is by far the easiest and cheapest way if you have good shocks now. and like i said before I hit bump stops before they bottom out and i have 0 issues flexing with them.

 

Cole

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I forgot to mention that mine werent cut and don't need to be. I know someone mentioned they had to cut theres but i don't see why. They may have done it differently. This is by far the easiest and cheapest way if you have good shocks now. and like i said before I hit bump stops before they bottom out and i have 0 issues flexing with them.

 

Cole

I wonder the same thing. Mine were also uncut, and I don't recall any cracks on them.

 

Let me tell ya though, a sawzall made quick work of rusted ubolts... :D

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Thanks Cole. I think I'[m gonna go that route initially, since I have the parts. If I have to change down the road, so be it.

 

:cheers:

 

Jeff

I had the exact same setup, and it looked to be in place for the better part of 10+yrs. Being that nothing was broken/bent/tweaked, I'd say its safe to use this setup with little worries. Then again, my truck was a 2wd, and probably didn't see much offroad. Point being, I'm sure it's seen a few pretty nasty pot holes, so it should be a fairly rugged system.
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Mine went threw ALOT of tellico and alot fo back woods trails. I have also flogged it thru mud and all over red clay hills. I have even ran it up a homemade RTI ramp and then used forklifts to lift 2 tires (LF-RR) and again no problems. I will safely say it will last and do well for a moderate wheeler.

Good luck guys

 

Cole

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