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How to tell if Comanche has Limited Slip / Posi?


Swanny
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OK, let's say I'm looking at a used Comanche for sale. I don't have the tools to jack up the back end and rotate one tire to see if it has a limited slip differential.

 

The truck in question is a 89 Eliminator. 4.0L, 5 spd, 2WD. Can I tell from the code on the door jamb or something? Or just dump the clutch and find out the fun way ;)

 

I haven't gone to look at the Jeep yet. It's in another province 550km away and so I can't even get there to see the truck for another 2 weeks (if it's not sold). :Canadaflag:

 

Also, with some weight in the back and some good tires, do the 2WD trucks go anywhere in the winter?

 

My wife has a 2007 Jeep Compass 4WD but I can't drive it too often so I want to make sure I can get around when we get a big snow dump.

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do they get around... well let me see. my 88 eliminator was covered to the windsheild and top of the bed one winter in our driveway. all I had in the bed was a few sandbags. and all i did to get it out that day was rock it a few times, but the tires i had on it were almost too warn out for the road car tires. so with trucks tires i bet it would have just pulled right out. i have never used the 4x4 on my 86 X, even when i was in mud up to my axles one time. so with car tires you would have no problem getting around.

 

Alex

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My 2wd 88 was armed with a stick shift and 30" BFGs and I would stay up late or get up early in order to play in the snow covered roads before the plows came by. :D Good tires, a bit of weight (right above or in front of the rear tires and secured) and some skills will go a long way on flat snowy roads. Deepest snow was about 8-10 inches. Oh, and don't put bags of salt in the bed.

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They can be a pain, but tire chains on a 2WD MJ are the cat's azz jamminz.gif I used them on mine until I converted it, and it dug thru almost everything. Only problem I had was when I got a wheel off into a ditch or deep rut (open diff), but got thru it feathering the brake pedal.

 

When you shovel out the driveway/sidewalk, toss the snow in the back of the bed for extra weight over the rear axle. Over the course of time, it hardens into a solid chunk.

 

Jeff

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You have to work pretty hard to get these things stuck, even with only 2wd, trust me I've been through mud holes and creeks where some of my friends couldn't in their jacked up chevs and fords. Although if it's a manual trans, during winter be careful that you don't accidentally downshift when you want to upshift, the tail end tends to get away from ya. :fool:

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