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Surface Prep, Acetone or Denatured Alcohol?


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Or is there a better cleaner?

 

Mineral spirits, or laquer thinner is the only things Ive ever used. Cheap and you can get them anywhere. good luck!

 

:agree:

 

That's after a good scrubbing with purple power to get rid of any grease or grease residue. :thumbsup:

 

 

:cheers:

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Choice of solvents best if you know what you're removing. Otherwise, the

multi-pronged approach recommended, starting with the least agressive.

Mechanical (brush) and water, then a good alkaline cleaner (marine clean,

tri-sodium phosphate, etc), then a fast evaporating solvent (I prefer

acetone or IPA rather than the oily residue mineral spirits or turpentine),

followed by acid etch (if needed) then very hot water and warm air to dry.

Best test of "really clean" is a water-break test where pure water sheets

(rather than beads) on the surface. This well tell you how well the surface

will participate in adhesion.

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i use dawn dishsoap and hot water to strip the wax and oils from the surface. then i follow with acetone. it's true that you can tell if you've removed the oils and wax by running water over the surface. if the water "sheets" off, you removed everything. if there is any beading, you need to redo everything. if you want to scuff the surface, use a stiff brush or (better) steel wool to scrub the surface with the dawn. this kills 2 birds with 1 stone. it's quick, cheap, and easy. :thumbsup:

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i use dawn dish-soap and hot water to strip the wax and oils from the surface. then i follow with acetone. it's true that you can tell if you've removed the oils and wax by running water over the surface. if the water "sheets" off, you removed everything. if there is any beading, you need to redo everything. if you want to scuff the surface, use a stiff brush or (better) steel wool to scrub the surface with the dawn. this kills 2 birds with 1 stone. it's quick, cheap, and easy. :thumbsup:

 

I also did it this way, only I used "scotch brite" pads instead of the steel wool!!

 

GREAT MINDS think alike!! :yes: :shake: :rotf: :rotf:

 

CW

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don't sand anything that has grease and dirt in. It will put deeper scratches in the paint and the grease/oils will get embedded into the paint deeper.

 

 

Your correct, if your prepping for a paint job... But for my preping it before a hurculiner install.. so scratches are like war wounds...not a problem at all!! :yes: :eek: :D

 

CW

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don't sand anything that has grease and dirt in. It will put deeper scratches in the paint and the grease/oils will get embedded into the paint deeper.

 

 

Your correct, if your prepping for a paint job... But for my preping it before a hurculiner install.. so scratches are like war wounds...not a problem at all!! :yes: :eek: :D

 

CW

Oh yeah rhino liner isnt going show any scratches..

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I'm a supervisor in an industrial paint shop. We go through thousands of gallons of two part polyurethane paint a week. It's kinda like rhino liner.

 

I'm still not an expert in coatings, but my advise is to find out whether the product your using bonds physically or chemically. Polyurethanes will bond chemically to themselves, you can recoat prior to full cure. But they bond physically to the substrate. The best way to get most paints to adhere is to prep the surface correctly, usually blasting to create an aggressive profile and good depth. Think micro sized Rocky Mountains, not micro Appalachians. It needs a jagged surface to stick to.

 

There are a lot of good cleaners out there, MEK is about as good as it gets, but has high VOCs. You can clean it perfectly, but if the substrate is smooth as a baby's bottom the paint will eventually come off, or get knocked off. Clean is important, but the blast profile is equally or more important! If they tell you they can paint they truck without blasting, I would be suspicious. If there's no blast, prepare to be ripped off, especially if they are applying over an existing coating.

 

Specific procedures are product dependent. Just follow the manufacturer's recommended prep procedures which are usually found on the product data sheet. Most are available on the manufacturer's website.

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