Jump to content

MJ rear window removal ?


Recommended Posts

Unless you have the proper tools and know how, let the professionals do it. Should cost you about $40-50 bucks. Don't let no fly by night company do it either. They should have a saws-all looking tool that has an offset blade and not a piece of wire to saw back and forth. You need to save the rubber so you can put it back in. There are no new ones and nobody makes an aftermarket one. I bought a whole truck just for the back window and gasket so my glass guy could take it out.

 

I'm assuming that this is a factory three pane slider with rubber surround(gasket). If not, and it's just an aftermarket one without the rubber, just use a hook blade from the inside after you have removed the interior trim from around the window. Either way, you will need to remove the trim to avoid damage.

 

:cheers:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Best way to remove the gasket is to start from the middle, pry it up with your fingers, finesse it around the corners.

I learned this the hard way, I cut up a good gasket to remove a slider. :wall:

Then I used a window remover, looks like a handle with an L shaped blade, has a real short piece of cable attached to a T handle, sorry, don't have a pic, but they are real common. Then you work the blade behind the frame, from the outside pull with the T handle on the cable, cut the gasket. Two tips, don't try this in the cold, and the tool is used to "cut" don't use it in a "rocking" motion or to pry with, DAMAGE CAN BE THE RESULT.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Best way to remove the gasket is to start from the middle, pry it up with your fingers, finesse it around the corners.

I learned this the hard way, I cut up a good gasket to remove a slider. :wall:

Then I used a window remover, looks like a handle with an L shaped blade, has a real short piece of cable attached to a T handle, sorry, don't have a pic, but they are real common. Then you work the blade behind the frame, from the outside pull with the T handle on the cable, cut the gasket. Two tips, don't try this in the cold, and the tool is used to "cut" don't use it in a "rocking" motion or to pry with, DAMAGE CAN BE THE RESULT.

 

Here's that piece of crap tool your referring too and you can see the window results behind it.

 

 

Unless you have used it before, don't bother. The money you spend could go to the professional to take it out. I would be curious to see your rubber surround that you pulled out by hand. These normally get some of the urethane on them and if you pull it the channel portion of the surround that wraps around the backside of the glass gets torn. I've attempted a hand full of these before getting the professionals with the proper tools do it. Not saying you can't do it yourself, but the odds are better with the pros.

 

:cheers:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I took a 1" putty knife.Put a sharp edge on the blade.Drilled a hole thru the handle and blade, inserted a steel pin. Keeps the handle from coming off when ya pull. Put the flat side of the blade next to the glass and push. After going all the way around take a piece of wood, shingle or shim and push it between the glass and frame. Gently, don't force it.Now start going around the glass again with the putty knife and working the shim in to hold the glass out.

1. do this on a warm day with the sun on the windshield.It can get hot and feel like your burning your hand. It is.

2.Take it easy. don't rush.

Took me 20 minutes to remove a S10 windshield this way. If I had the money I would have paid a pro to do it.

64Cheyenne has an excellent writeup on this subject in the DIY Project write up forum with nice pics. Wonder why he didn't mention it in his reply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first reply was before I did the DIY on my back window. I would have used the windshield knife in the removal of my back window

but I got in a hurry, It was cold out, didn't want to wait for the sun, had a heat gun but got lazy and didn't use it, broke the blade of the knife. Either way works for me, it's just that if I was to use the knife I have to be careful not to pry with the blade, wait till the old gasket material is really warm before I was to use the knife, take my time. The cable works well because old bicycles are everywhere, BEWARE...the cable can get really hot from the sawing action, guess how I know?

Anyway, here is the link for the backwindow viewtopic.php?f=9&t=19487&start=0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...