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himz gonna eat cha!!!


icurunnin
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Finally took some pics of Nato our blue pit today. He is 9 months now and is a lot bigger than the last pics. He gets much attention on every walk and is very friendly despite the "pit bulls are dangerous" thing going around now :rotf: .

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nice looking dog but it wouldn't live by me

i love dogs

i have a big mut

pit bulls can be a great dog for years till that one day there inbreeding gets the best of them and thay snap

i know i will catch $#!& for tis but i don't care

i have trained dogs including police dogs so i know from expiriance pits are bad no matter how good u train them there brain chemistry is messed up thay are fighters that is all thay are good for and no i'm not for dog fighting

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Thats a nice looking pup. But, I wouldn't own one either, especially if I had children of any age. Something, and I don't think anyone knows what, flips their mode into violence in an instant. It's happened way to many times. As previously stated training doesn't remove the switch, it's always there. As the lil ol grandmother two weeks ago found out when she left her precious lil bulls with her 7 month old grandchild while she walked into the kitchen to get its bottle and a few seconds later came back to find it dead and shredded. It happens on a weekly basis. There's to much of a danger risk in owning a pit. I don't allow them on my property. I never trusted my big Rhodesian Ridgeback around smaller childeren as he sometimes thought they were a toy. Just my personal observation. Everybody got their thing.

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my neighbor had a red nose pit since he was a pup who they raised to fight. he was huge and very aggresive if you got close to his yard. but my neighbor and I who were 10 at the time and use to play with the dog all the time and punch and kick him just playin around.

and not ONCE in his 7 years of being around us did he snap or even growl at us. I think its all about how you raise them and if you give them the attention they need or not.

I have girls who are 6 and 11 and while I love my pup, I know not to let the girls play with him by them self. I know he wouldnt hurt them but I am not a retarded parent like those on the news and leave my pit unattended with others besides myself or my wife.

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pit bulls can be a great dog for years till that one day there inbreeding gets the best of them and thay snap

That's an urban legend and has been proven wrong many, many times.

 

can never be out side the house unless it is on a leash in a persons hand

or pened with fence whit chain link roof and concret floor and gate has to padlocked

this is the law were i live

Just because something is law doesn't mean the law is a good law, or makes any sense.

 

I'm old enough that when I was growing up, nobody had heard of "pit bulls" but we heard all those same stories about Rotweilers and Dobermans. Now the focus is pit bulls. Next decade, after all those laws haven't protected anybody from mauling by excessivley inbred Yorkshire Terriers, there will be laws about Yorkies.

 

Kneejerk idiocy, is what laws like that are.

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probably not good considering he is a 9 month old pup and was not raised to fight.

he will lick you to death and lay next to you for hours though.

Michael Vick is a douche and a reason these dogs started catching even more heat. He will pay for it when he gets out. just watch

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Not that I believe everything I read on the web but this is an interesting read with a lot of facts and links to other sites. Dog Bite Law

 

You may say urban legend but it seems every owner of a dog that has attacked someone starts off with, "He's never done anything like this before". Kind of like, " he was such a good kid, went to church, helped the elderly, I just can't believe he killed all those people".

 

Here's a snipet from the above link.

 

The deadliest dogs

 

Merritt Clifton, editor of Animal People, has conducted an unusually detailed study of dog bites from 1982 to the present. (Clifton, Dog attack deaths and maimings, U.S. & Canada, September 1982 to November 13, 2006; click here to read it.) The Clifton study show the number of serious canine-inflicted injuries by breed. The author's observations about the breeds and generally how to deal with the dangerous dog problem are enlightening.

 

According to the Clifton study, pit bulls, Rottweilers, Presa Canarios and their mixes are responsible for 74% of attacks that were included in the study, 68% of the attacks upon children, 82% of the attacks upon adults, 65% of the deaths, and 68% of the maimings. In more than two-thirds of the cases included in the study, the life-threatening or fatal attack was apparently the first known dangerous behavior by the animal in question. Clifton states:

 

If almost any other dog has a bad moment, someone may get bitten, but will not be maimed for life or killed, and the actuarial risk is accordingly reasonable. If a pit bull terrier or a Rottweiler has a bad moment, often someone is maimed or killed--and that has now created off-the-chart actuarial risk, for which the dogs as well as their victims are paying the price.

 

Clifton's opinions are as interesting as his statistics. For example, he says, "Pit bulls and Rottweilers are accordingly dogs who not only must be handled with special precautions, but also must be regulated with special requirements appropriate to the risk they may pose to the public and other animals, if they are to be kept at all."

 

 

I'm not preaching, just showing what I found. My neighbor raises and sales the pit's and I cringe everytime I see a bunch of kids playing with those cute little puppies and the parents handing him the cash.

 

One final thought, Why would you title this, "himz gonna eat cha!!!", if not in the back of your mind you didn't think it might be possible. Again, just a thought and not trying to start anything here.

 

:cheers:

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See, the thing is ... if you collect enough statistics and then you sift, sort and stack them enough ... you can make them "say" pretty much anything you want them to say.

 

For example: In the study cited above, it appears the study (or at least the statistics reported here) was limited to attacks resulting in maiming, serious injury, or death. So -- how about statistics involving other dogs and attacks that didn't result in death or serious maiming?

 

I've been bitten by three dogs. Not one of them was a breed typically regarded as dangerous, and the owners were handy to grab the dog before either the dog or I became a statistic. So those attacks, and similar attacks, would not be included in the above report. But they were either isolated instances, or "first signs" of an aggressive dog that put the owners on notice to prevent recurrences. Okay, you can say those weren't serious attacks. But ... perhaps those dogs were prevented from becoming "statistics" because their first attack WAS stopped before it became serious, and the owners were then on notice and took precautions.

 

My family always had dogs when I was a kid. Our first was an almost pure-bred Collie. A real Lassie. Everybody loves Lassie, right? No insurance company worries about Lassie. But we had to keep ours locked up tight any time anyone visited our house, or she'd take a piece out of them. I'm not talking typical Border Collie nip at the heels to herd type stuff, I'm talking serious "Me dog, you dinner" type stuff.

 

After she died, we got a pure-bred German Shepherd. Our insurance company went nuts, and threatened to cancel our homeowners coverage. We kept the dog (and the insurance). She lived eleven years, and never bothered anybody. We never even tied her up -- she was free to roam the neighborhood and say hello to the neighbors, and she did so on a regular, daily routine. But Shepherds had a "rep" as dangerous dogs.

 

A friend who retired out west has two dogs that are half wolf. Everybody knows wold half-breeds can't be trusted, or even domesticated. I guess someone forgot to tell these two rascals, though, because she's had them for years and they never bother anybody.

 

I contend it's all in the training and upbringing.

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One final thought, Why would you title this, "himz gonna eat cha!!!", if not in the back of your mind you didn't think it might be possible. Again, just a thought and not trying to start anything here. :cheers:

 

Yeah, "himz gonna eat cha!!!" is a real poor choice for your thread title. I agree with the other posters that the upbringing of the dog has the most to do with his adult responses and behavior toward other animals (w. 4-legs or 2-legs), not the breed. The meanest dog I have ever seen was not a Pit, Doberman, Rott, Shepard, or any of the other so-called "strong" breeds; it was a Chesapeake Bay Retriever. 100+ pounds of pure hell towards ALL people and other dogs until he was put down. Hopefully you will continue to put plenty of time and work into your young Pit, it's a beautiful animal, and make him a "balanced" dog as my hero Caesar says. Good luck mate. :cheers:

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I said it joking around with the pics we snapped of him. I am no where near worried about my dog hurting anyone or myself. I took him to a friends house who has a blue female and he just stayed next to me on guard and played with her very little.

 

He is a great dog and the breed can be brought up to be civil and friendly. My neighbor had three german shepards that I could have swore came from the pits of hell when I was growing up :fs1: . They couldnt be around anyone at anytime with or without owners around.

 

I have seen more dogs that are off your statistics chart that have been more aggresive than pit I have seen :mad: .

 

Let me change my title real quick as not to come across as having a dog who would hurt someone :shake:

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Well I can't remember how many times I've been bitten, but none of them was by a pit. The two major bites was by german shepherds and the worst one was in the face. Dog chased me down on my bike and started chewing. Owner claimed that I must have done something to him but my friends that were with me knew better. Those were never reported attacks so I'll agree that the statistics may be skewed somewhat.

 

The quote didn't keep the link to the data they used which included all the breeds so here it is. Click Here

My current dog is a mutt however it has akita, shepherd, husky, and chow in him which are all on that list. He's never bitten anyone but, I know he is more than able if he wanted. He's a great gaurd dog and has all my neighbors respect.

 

I do agree that how a dog is raised will impact his actions, however you might be doing a great job but something happens that your unaware of that sets him on an agressive path. For example, I consider myself a good dog owner and have never thaught any of my animals to be mean. However, I had a chow mix that unknown to me, was being teased by my neighbors kids. I caught them one day and caught my dog as she was halfway across the fence. From that, she hated children and was quite racist even though I tried to teach her that it was wrong.

 

Just remember that you must respect that a domestic dog has primal tendencies. After all, they were bread from some form of wild dog, some hundreds of years ago.

 

So you don't think I'm just blinded by the stat's, here's a link defending the breed that is a good read as well. Click Here

And here's a snipet from it.

 

Accordingly, PBRC is committed to educating current and potential pit bull owners so they have a better understanding of their dog and thus provide responsible and caring ownership. PBRC does not wish to overemphasize the fighting aspect of the breed’s history, a history that does not negate their various positive traits or their scientifically proven gentleness toward humans. But we do acknowledge the importance of respecting the breed’s history. This is not to suggest that pit bulls are “different” or “unique” in a way that makes them dangerous. Those who claim that pit bulls are “different” fail to understand that all dog breeds are, in some way, different from each other. That’s what makes them dog breeds! (Besides, many breeds were historically bred to fight other animals. Pit bulls are not unique in this sense.)

 

Let me change my title real quick as not to come across as having a dog who would hurt someone

 

Your dog is very capable of hurting someone. It's just up to you to make sure he doesn't. :thumbsup:

 

Again, not trying to attack you about your choice of dog, but it's not one I think I could own. (yeah, I'm one of the "others")

I'll let it rest and I sorry to pull this off topic. I hope that your new member of the family will give you many years of loyalty and companionship.

 

:cheers:

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Very handsome dog. We have a red nosed red named Ruby (of course) and she's an amazing dog. She plays fine with dogs smaller than her head, she's gotten along with our daughter since the day we brought her home, and she never leaves the fenced yard unless she's leashed.

It's not always completely the upbringing of the dog that determines its attitude. Originally these dogs were bred solely for aggression towards other animals, and if a dog bit it's handler, it would be put down on the spot. For example, if a handler broke a hold between two dogs, it wouldn't rear back and bite him. This caused those tendencies to be eliminated from the breed until years and years later when people got the bright idea to breed and train them as guard dogs, and encouraging human aggressive behavior. It's not the "inbreeding" that did it, it was the lack of restraint when breeding a working dog. If you look back at the pedigrees of several champion dogs among several breeds, you see a lot of inbreeding. So in short, it's a combination of poor breeding choices, poor training, irresponsible ownership, and abuse that causes this breed a problem.

Never thought I'd use the soapbox smiley...but soapbox.gif it's just something I feel very strongly about.

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I also had one for a while. I made sure it was from a very reputable breeder, they showed me pics of their dogs in books from the pet store, showed me trophys that their dogs had one, and paperwork and all bloodlines. The key is how you raise the dog. My dog was great and never violent or aggressive toward anyone unless they were aggressive toward us (me, my wife , and kids). She was jealous tho, she would lay between us in the bed and try to push us apart so she could be in the middle :dunno: . I would love to get another, but unfortunately they have passed a law in my town where you are not allowed to own one, unless you had it before the law was passed. Again, caused by media hype and closed minded people. The most vicious dog i remember was a poodle when i was growing up.

 

The pit bull myth about turning on owners is almost as big a joke as roid rage.

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