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I'm sure they're on here someplace, but can't seem to find it.

Are the leaf spring lengths the same for the long bed and the short bed or are they different? I'm looking for the eye to eye length. Need to temp swap in springs to be able to roll around, and I have a long bed parts truck and short bed project.

 

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spring lengths are the same for SWB and LWB.

 

However, the arch is diff from 2wd to 4wd.

How much arch difference between 2x4 and 4x4? I just did a SOA on my 2wd and got almost 6" of lift. Would I get more from 4wd springs?

 

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4WD sits 1-inch higher than 2WD. The arch of the springs doesn't affect how much lift you get from a SOA conversion. The lift comes from moving the spring to above the axle -- if you start from the 2WD height, you'll end up with the 2WD height plus 'X' inches. If you start from the 4WD height, yiou'll end up with the 4WD height plus the same 'X' inches.

 

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spring lengths are the same for SWB and LWB.

 

However, the arch is diff from 2wd to 4wd.

How much arch difference between 2x4 and 4x4? I just did a SOA on my 2wd and got almost 6" of lift. Would I get more from 4wd springs?

 

Sent from my SM-N900W8 using Tapatalk

4WD sits 1-inch higher than 2WD. The arch of the springs doesn't affect how much lift you get from a SOA conversion. The lift comes from moving the spring to above the axle -- if you start from the 2WD height, you'll end up with the 2WD height plus 'X' inches. If you start from the 4WD height, yiou'll end up with the 4WD height plus the same 'X' inches.

 

Yup I realize that, just didn't know they were a different height to begin with.

 

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spring lengths are the same for SWB and LWB.

 

However, the arch is diff from 2wd to 4wd.

How much arch difference between 2x4 and 4x4? I just did a SOA on my 2wd and got almost 6" of lift. Would I get more from 4wd springs?

 

Sent from my SM-N900W8 using Tapatalk

4WD sits 1-inch higher than 2WD. The arch of the springs doesn't affect how much lift you get from a SOA conversion. The lift comes from moving the spring to above the axle -- if you start from the 2WD height, you'll end up with the 2WD height plus 'X' inches. If you start from the 4WD height, yiou'll end up with the 4WD height plus the same 'X' inches.

 

Yup I realize that, just didn't know they were a different height to begin with.

 

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But your question was, would you get more "lift" from 4WD springs. The answer is, "No."  If a spring-over conversion nets 6-inches of lift, that's how much lift you'll get. If you start with a truck that rides one inch higher, you'll end up with a truck that rides one inch higher. I was afraid you were conflating "lift" with "ride height." They're two completely separate issues.

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Sorry, I should have been clearer. My basic thought was, I could get another inch of ride height if I put in 4wd springs. But on deeper reflection, it hardly seems worth it. I could just put longer shackles in the back and achieve basically the same thing.

 

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Sorry, I should have been clearer. My basic thought was, I could get another inch of ride height if I put in 4wd springs. But on deeper reflection, it hardly seems worth it. I could just put longer shackles in the back and achieve basically the same thing.

 

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Yes, you can use an extended shackle to grab another inch w/o any ill effects. I did this after my new MT springs settled out about 3/4" over a years time using the Teraflex shackles. 

 

4WD sits 1-inch higher than 2WD.

I think this is a crock and is a contradicted factoid throughout the various FSM's. 2WD and 4WD vehicles can use the same springs and other suspension parts, wheels, etc. and you could order any combination of these suspension parts in both models. You can't make a blanket general statement that all 4WD trucks were 1" taller than all 2WD trucks from the factory. And "factory" ride height and how to measure it varies depending on which model (year) FSM you are looking at.

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Sorry, I should have been clearer. My basic thought was, I could get another inch of ride height if I put in 4wd springs. But on deeper reflection, it hardly seems worth it. I could just put longer shackles in the back and achieve basically the same thing.

 

Sent from my SM-N900W8 using Tapatalk

Yes, you can use an extended shackle to grab another inch w/o any ill effects. I did this after my new MT springs settled out about 3/4" over a years time using the Teraflex shackles. 

 

4WD sits 1-inch higher than 2WD.

I think this is a crock and is a contradicted factoid throughout the various FSM's. 2WD and 4WD vehicles can use the same springs and other suspension parts, wheels, etc. and you could order any combination of these suspension parts in both models. You can't make a blanket general statement that all 4WD trucks were 1" taller than all 2WD trucks from the factory. And "factory" ride height and how to measure it varies depending on which model (year) FSM you are looking at.

 

 

Sorry, Don, but this is not contradicted by the FSMs, it's confirmed by the FSMs. When measuring ride height per the FSM, the MJ FSM provides two different heights, one for the 2WD and one for the 4WD. The 4WD is 1-inch higher than the 2WD. What I've always found curious, though, is that this applies only to the MJ and not to the XJ.

 

From a 3-year old thread:

 

 

Mine come from Jeep tech bulletin I.S. 14E, which is Comanche specific. Considering that the information for the front is the same but the rear is different, I wonder if the above measurements might be for the XJ.

 

According to the factory bulletin, the measurement for the front should be 17 cm (6-3/4 inches) plus or minus 13 mm (1/2 inch) for two-wheel drive vehicles. For four-wheel drive, it should be 20 cm (7-3/4 inches) plus or minus 13 mm (1/2 inch).

 

For the rear, on two-wheel drive vehicles the vertical distance should be 21 cm (8.2 inches) plus or minus 13 mm (1/2 inch). On four-wheel drive vehicles, the vertical distance should be 23 cm (9.2 inches) plus or minus 13 mm (1/2 inch).

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