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Welder for someone just getting started?


fendermb4
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You could get a buzz box pretty cheap.

 

The prices on MIG welders have really dropped as well.

 

Personally I would pick up a MIG welder and then just start welding on scrap steel. Migs tend to be much easier to learn on. The buzz box is harder.

 

I was lucky enough to have taken a welding class back in school, so I understood the basics. I also work with two certified welders for pointers!!

 

 

 

BTW, fendermb4, where are you in CT?? I am in Meriden.

 

CW

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mig welding is pretty darn easy once you get the hang of it, but stick welding is harder, but you get more penetration in thicker metals which is the most important part of a weld.

 

tig welding is really nice and everything but too much money for the newb.

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take a welding class at your local community college. then figure out what you want and fits your budget.

 

I'm in the Hebron CT area. Are you familiar with it? By Marlborough, Colchester, etc.

 

Yeah, I think I'm gonna try and do the class at a community college thing. I'm hoping to find one nearby that is a not for credit type course, so I don't have to deal with application fee's and actually enrolling in the college.

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lincolns are good starters just don't use flux core i hate that stuff!

 

I like flux core. lol

 

The biggest mistake people make is buying a 110 mig first instead of a 220 volt mig. Sure you save a couple hundred dollars initially but for bumpers and brackets and general fabrication you are going to want a 220 volt mig eventually. So just buy it from the get go and never look back.

 

You can get good deals on Lincoln 175's on ebay from time to time. I paid $400 shipped for mine a few years ago.

 

Mig is the easiest to learn. Grab a huge pile of scrap metal buy a bunch of wire, ask a few welding buddies to give you some tips on patterns, open the door up on the welder to see the setting recomendations and build yourself a metal sculpture. Do this for a few weeks and you'll figure it out. jamminz.gif

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take a welding class at your local community college. then figure out what you want and fits your budget.

 

I'm in the Hebron CT area. Are you familiar with it? By Marlborough, Colchester, etc.

 

Yeah, I think I'm gonna try and do the class at a community college thing. I'm hoping to find one nearby that is a not for credit type course, so I don't have to deal with application fee's and actually enrolling in the college.

 

I know it very well. I have a bunch of friends and wheeling buddies out that way!!!

 

Are you a member of any local clubs?

 

CW

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take a welding class at your local community college. then figure out what you want and fits your budget.

 

Welding is an ability that you have. It can be learned, but there are just natural welders out there. I suggest you research, do more research, take a class, and then decide if you want to spend the money on the equipment. Welding machines lead to other machines. I personaly have a horizontal band saw, Chop saw, drill press, and 2 different cutting torch setups. Did I mention I own to welding machines, and looking to buy a third, cause I didnt buy a big enough one the first 2 times

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take a welding class at your local community college. then figure out what you want and fits your budget.

 

I'm in the Hebron CT area. Are you familiar with it? By Marlborough, Colchester, etc.

 

Yeah, I think I'm gonna try and do the class at a community college thing. I'm hoping to find one nearby that is a not for credit type course, so I don't have to deal with application fee's and actually enrolling in the college.

 

I know it very well. I have a bunch of friends and wheeling buddies out that way!!!

 

Are you a member of any local clubs?

 

CW

 

No, I am only now getting into wheeling, which is part of the reason I just bought my MJ. Presently, I am trying to find somewhere to do it in CT - so far not an easy thing. I spent the last several years in the go-fast community (right now its an SRT4), so I don't know a lot of off roaders around here yet.

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take a welding class at your local community college. then figure out what you want and fits your budget.

 

Welding is an ability that you have. It can be learned, but there are just natural welders out there. I suggest you research, do more research, take a class, and then decide if you want to spend the money on the equipment. Welding machines lead to other machines. I personaly have a horizontal band saw, Chop saw, drill press, and 2 different cutting torch setups. Did I mention I own to welding machines, and looking to buy a third, cause I didnt buy a big enough one the first 2 times

 

I'm ok with that. I've been a woodworker and shade tree mechanic since I was young, so my basement and garage are already pretty well littered with gear.

 

Sounds like I want to buy a bigger welder than I would have thought, as a couple of you mentioned not to bother with something too small, or else I'd want to replace it.

 

Also, it sounds like Mig is the way to go, and 220V, not 110. I'll probably see how a class goes before I buy one though.

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Well, if you can stick... It's cheaper.

 

 

It just takes longer unless you use really thick rod. But, you can do cast steel/iron with it too. I'd NEVER do that with a MIG.

 

Edit: As I was unsure I checked and you can get high-nickel wire for a MIG to weld cast steel/iron.

 

 

I mean, my AC/DC lincoln can do 225A AC and 135A DC which is plenty from the amperage standpoint unless I'm planning to try welding 1/2" steel overhead...

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Well, if you can stick... It's cheaper.

 

 

 

I mean, my AC/DC lincoln can do 225A AC and 135A DC which is plenty from the amperage standpoint unless I'm planning to try welding 1/2" steel overhead...

 

The only problem with larger rods is heat control, and the heat affected zone caused by the jewel input. I keep a wide selection of rod on hand, just cause you never know what you are going to weld. I am personally looking at an ESAB that can do all the different processes including TIG, but it is a matter of which is more important.... rebuilding Pong or having fancy tools.

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