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Posi-lock "selectable locker"


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I got a great (great!) deal on a NIB posi-lock set. So, instead of an aussie front locker, I am going to weld the front diff up and use the posi-lock to lock/unlock one side. This has been done many times before, I know, but I still think that for the money it is a cool idea. I know that it will not be 100% same as a selectable locker as only the driver's side wheel will have power in 4wd/unlocked mode. There will be no differentiation form side to side. The plan is 3" lift and 32x9.5's.

 

The rear has a trash-loc that, against all odds, still holds bias under powerbraking on pavement. When it dies, I think I will go to a no-slip made for a D44 trac-loc as the trac-loc case is beefier that an open case. No gear messin' and it would be closer in strength to an actual locker.

 

Now I need to find the 297-jointed '95 YJ axle to maintain my disco axle and still be able to upgrade the axle u-joints. I believe that I should also upgrade the shift fork?

 

Thoughts? Ideas? Throw rotten fruit at me?

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Your not going to like it one bit if you ever engage 4WD on the street. Its gonna bind and somethings gotta give... may not be purdy.

 

I would only ever consider welding (or spool) ANY differential for an off road only vehicle.

 

CW

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I have run spools in high-horsepower street cars ( even driving a 450hp Super bee all winter in Ohio with a spool) without an issue, but that of course is just the rear. But I have had F/R spooled D44's under a commando and drove it on pavement covered in several inches of snow by leaving one hub unlocked with no issues.

 

Why would one use 4wd on the street unless it was so covered that you might as well be off-road? It isn't a FT transfer case....? Even open axles blow t-cases for people who use P/T cases and 4wd on dry pavement. I avoid 4hi even on snow covered streets unless it is so bad that the 2wd vehicles are not able to move. Some with hard off-road surfaces

 

I admit to not being a huge fan of chain-driven/aluminum cased transfer cases in the first place, and even my kj has a 241 & not the rather smallish 231 that the MJ has, but I am hoping that the 1,000 # weight difference will keep the 231 alive.

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I run spools front and rear on my daily driver YJ, ran lincoln lockers f/r in my stock axles before upgrading to 44's. I run a cable disconnect as well in order to run 3wd on the trails in the tight sections. I chose a disconnect SJ 44 just for this reason. Works great for me, spools onroad aren't bad at all. Not for everybody but great for me. jamminz.gif

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I have run spools in high-horsepower street cars ( even driving a 450hp Super bee all winter in Ohio with a spool) without an issue, but that of course is just the rear. But I have had F/R spooled D44's under a commando and drove it on pavement covered in several inches of snow by leaving one hub unlocked with no issues.

 

Why would one use 4wd on the street unless it was so covered that you might as well be off-road? It isn't a FT transfer case....? Even open axles blow t-cases for people who use P/T cases and 4wd on dry pavement. I avoid 4hi even on snow covered streets unless it is so bad that the 2wd vehicles are not able to move. Some with hard off-road surfaces

 

I admit to not being a huge fan of chain-driven/aluminum cased transfer cases in the first place, and even my KJ has a 241 & not the rather smallish 231 that the MJ has, but I am hoping that the 1,000 # weight difference will keep the 231 alive.

 

Like I said, its nothing I would do. But good luck with that! Question asked, comment answered...

 

CW

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as someone that's been puttering his wheeler around on a single front tire for a while now (ford front axle with spool and I have only one hub locked), I can explain that one. When power is applied, the torque-steer is incredible and will turn the steering wheel in my hands. then, when I let off the gas, the reverse happens and the truck tries to turn the other way. not fun. When in 4wd, the effect is lessened.

 

 

But more to the point, I HATE MY FRONT MINISPOOL!!! straight-line traction is nice (as you might guess), but as soon as I turn the wheel, I hate it. If there's enough traction (you'd be surprised how often that happens on an otherwise slippery looking muddy trail), the steering wheel simply won't turn. (and if everything's bound up that tight, your posi-lock might not release. I know my hubs are a real pain to unlock). If everything is really slippery, the wheel will turn, but the truck won't always turn. Nothing like plowing in a perfectly straight line when you're trying to do doughnuts in the mud.

 

At first opportunity I'm dumping it for a regular locker. (It'd be in there already if those tiny hub bolts hadn't rust-welded themselves in.)

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as someone that's been puttering his wheeler around on a single front tire for a while now (ford front axle with spool and I have only one hub locked), I can explain that one. When power is applied, the torque-steer is incredible and will turn the steering wheel in my hands. then, when I let off the gas, the reverse happens and the truck tries to turn the other way. not fun. When in 4wd, the effect is lessened.

 

 

But more to the point, I HATE MY FRONT MINISPOOL!!! straight-line traction is nice (as you might guess), but as soon as I turn the wheel, I hate it. If there's enough traction (you'd be surprised how often that happens on an otherwise slippery looking muddy trail), the steering wheel simply won't turn. (and if everything's bound up that tight, your posi-lock might not release. I know my hubs are a real pain to unlock). If everything is really slippery, the wheel will turn, but the truck won't always turn. Nothing like plowing in a perfectly straight line when you're trying to do doughnuts in the mud.

 

At first opportunity I'm dumping it for a regular locker. (It'd be in there already if those tiny hub bolts hadn't rust-welded themselves in.)

 

 

It's called 'plow' when you turn the wheel, and continue going straight anyway.

 

Loose surfaces would do it to my old MJ (Lockright ft, Spool rear).

 

Loose crushed gravel parking lots were by far the worst,

I'd cut the wheel all the way, and still have to bang a three pointer to turn around.

 

I figured either the loose surface didn't offer enough traction to 'unlock' the lockright,

or the gravel was loose enough that the spooled rear was able to push the Jeep straight, no matter how far you turned the wheel.

 

Either way, it didn't do it with a Spool rear & Open ft,

and when I swapped the rear Spool for a Full Detroit, I got my turning radius back.

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