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Centering pins & Anti-friction pads?


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Eagle,

I was on there yesterday, but couldn't find any link to the anti-friction pads.

 

BTW...anyone know what centering bolts I need for stock 2WD leaf packs?

 

The standard MJ leaf springs use a 3/8" center bolt; the MT springs use a 1/2" bolt. Why don't you PM HellCreek (Tom), he might have all you need as he builds MJ springs.

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Eagle,

I was on there yesterday, but couldn't find any link to the anti-friction pads.

 

BTW...anyone know what centering bolts I need for stock 2WD leaf packs?

 

The standard MJ leaf springs use a 3/8" center bolt; the MT springs use a 1/2" bolt. Why don't you PM HellCreek (Tom), he might have all you need as he builds MJ springs.

 

I've sent Tom from HellCreek a PM, but I will post here as well just to get some input.

 

I picked up a set of the Blue Torch Fab spring perches. These things are VERY BEEFY, but the hole for the centering pin is 5/8"! Does anyone have any idea if pins can be bought that have that large of a head on them? I'd imagine I could possibly use an allen head bolt with that large of a head, but will that be strong enough? I don't have an issue drilling out each spring for a larger diamter bolt, I just want to make sure I am doing this right. I figure the larger the pin, the less chance of axle wrap?

 

Thanks,

Aaron

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I figure the larger the pin, the less chance of axle wrap?

Wrong. The pin just holds the leaves from sliding relative to each other. The pin is at the point where the axle sits, and that's the fulcrum for axle wrap. The diameter of the pin does NOTHING to prevent axle wrap.

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I had the same problem with the Mopar perches (5/8"). I ended up installing the pins "backwards", with the pin ends and nuts into the hole in the perch. The nuts fit very snugly into the hole, plus they were 2X the height of the hex head on the pin and sit farther into the hole. So far no problems.

 

I wasn't about to drill out all of the leaves.....

 

Jeff

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I figure the larger the pin, the less chance of axle wrap?

Wrong. The pin just holds the leaves from sliding relative to each other. The pin is at the point where the axle sits, and that's the fulcrum for axle wrap. The diameter of the pin does NOTHING to prevent axle wrap.

 

So the length of the perch determines the amount of axle wrap?

 

I had the same problem with the Mopar perches (5/8"). I ended up installing the pins "backwards", with the pin ends and nuts into the hole in the perch. The nuts fit very snugly into the hole, plus they were 2X the height of the hex head on the pin and sit farther into the hole. So far no problems.

 

I wasn't about to drill out all of the leaves.....

 

Jeff

 

What size pins did you use? I don't have a problem doing it that way at all, as long as it is quick and easy :brows:

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Hi, Aaron,

 

I received your PM, but I wanted to answer your question on the forum, so the rest of the guys could see the answer.

 

The reason that the SOA perches have a 5/8" hole is that the stock springs have the center bolt head on the top for a standard SUA application. To keep people from having to remove the bolt and turn it over, they drill the SOA perches to 5/8" to fit over the nut. Yes, a socket head cap screw will work very well for a spring center bolt in a SOA application. The centering hole in the factory SUA perch is 12mm, so we turn down the standard 9/16" bolt heads in a lathe before we install them in our springs. The head size on a 3/8" socket head cap screw is also 9/16".

 

Eagle is absolutely correct (as always), the center bolt merely holds the spring pack together and locates the spring on the axle perch.

 

-Tom

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  • 4 years later...

Since this thread got dug up from the grave already, I'll weigh in. I just built my springs and used GM pads from Dorman #31067. They're round, but they're much thicker than the Jeep ones and come with soft rubber insulators that service a noise concern. Do they fit like stock? No. It took less than a minute of work with a knife for them to fit and I'm very pleased with the results. I'll need to wash more mud out of my springs after I wheel but I think that's a fine compromise. It cost me about $30.

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