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ever heard of Stanley Springs?


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so on the 89 I was underneath when I noticed a smooth spot on top of the springs at the back. closer inspection shows me that they are NOT stock (unless the metric tonnes were by stanley).

they say Stanley Springs number 97 555 with another number of 20020118 by Payton Inc in Harrisburg, PA.

 

anyone ever heard of them? I had my suspcions as the ubolts weren't the stock ones either, but the more I look, the more I think these are high arch 2 or 3" lift springs.

 

if that's the case, I may be able to tear apart the 3800 and swap the springs, put these springs in it, and remove the AAL from the 2wd springs, and install them on the 89.

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Hi, Jeepco,

 

Stanley Springs is an old spring manufacturer. I am not sure that they are still in business.

The 97 555 number is a SRI (Spring Research Institute) designation. Like most of the Comanche rear springs, it is made from 3 leaves of .291 thick spring steel with a .622 inch 2nd stage bottom leaf. your spring should have 10-1/4" of free arch (unloaded, or off of the truck). The Metric ton spring should be a 97-571, which would have a .291" main leaf, .323" 2nd and 3rd leaves, and a 2nd stage pack made from .590 and .625. The capacity on your springs would be 1280 lbs, and the capacity on the 97-571's would be 1700 lbs.

 

Thanks,

Tom

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Hi, Jeepco,

 

Stanley Springs is an old spring manufacturer. I am not sure that they are still in business.

The 97 555 number is a SRI (Spring Research Institute) designation. Like most of the Comanche rear springs, it is made from 3 leaves of .291 thick spring steel with a .622 inch 2nd stage bottom leaf. your spring should have 10-1/4" of free arch (unloaded, or off of the truck). The Metric ton spring should be a 97-571, which would have a .291" main leaf, .323" 2nd and 3rd leaves, and a 2nd stage pack made from .590 and .625. The capacity on your springs would be 1280 lbs, and the capacity on the 97-571's would be 1700 lbs.

 

Thanks,

Tom

 

Good god I would love to be able to recall that kind of info from the top of my head :eek:

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Hi, Twisty,

 

Me too. Actually, I was looking at the blueprints.

 

Jeepco,

 

It depends on what you have as a stock spring. Our 1989 Sport Truck had the 3+1 spring with a 8-3/4" standard arch and a capacity of 1100 lbs. Jeep also offered the same spring with 7-5/8", 9-1/4", 9-3/4" and 10-1/4" arch - all made from the same size steel, with capacities of 980 lbs., 1160 lbs., 1220 lbs., and 1280 lbs., respectively. They also offered a 4+1 spring with 9-1/8" arch and a capacity of 1440 lbs., and of course the metric ton spring with 3+2 leaves and a 9-1/2" arch and a capacity of 1700 lbs. Since the springs are pretty much the same, except for the last two, all you would have to do is subtract the arch on your springs from the arch on the new springs to see how much you would gain.

 

The lift springs that we are developing are based on the 1100 lb. springs that were on our Sport Truck, since they were the best all-around spring and would offer the best flex.

 

BTW, would anybody like to test our 6 inch rear SUA springs?

 

Thanks,

Tom

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I had a set of metric ton springs made up by General Springs (3+2 leaves, 9-5/8" arch, 1500 lbs. capacity) and netted 2-1/2" lift on the rear over the 4-leaf 980 lb stockers. That's with the camper shell and gear in the back. They ride just slightly stiffer than the old springs and have not sagged at all in over a year now.

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hellcreek, I have no idea what you were saying.

 

the entire spring pack is a replacement by them, not just one spring...

 

I think.

 

 

and yes, I would be willing to test your 6" SUA springs as the 89 will be retaining it's SUA perches.

 

let me know on that.

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Jeepco,

 

Sorry for the confusion. I assumed that you were taking the 97-555 springs with the 10-1/4" arch from the 1989 MJ and installing them on the 3800, and you wanted to know how much you would gain on that swap. I probably misunderstood you.

 

I will need your address to send you the 6" rear springs for testing. You can e-mail that info to me at tlaher@hellcreeksuspensions.com.

 

Thanks,

Tom

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Jeepco,

 

Sorry for the confusion. I assumed that you were taking the 97-555 springs with the 10-1/4" arch from the 1989 MJ and installing them on the 3800, and you wanted to know how much you would gain on that swap. I probably misunderstood you.

 

I will need your address to send you the 6" rear springs for testing. You can e-mail that info to me at tlaher@hellcreeksuspensions.com.

 

Thanks,

Tom

 

you didn't misunderstand me...I just completely don't understand you lol. I was wondering what lift these springs will offer in any application, so what I can expect. I'm generally pretty good with numbers but not so good having alot thrown at me.

 

I'll email you here soon. lets talk first so that I know exactly what kind of feedback you are looking for.

 

thanks,

 

Pat

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Hi, Pat,

 

What I was trying to say was that, if your original springs are the ones with the 7-5/8" of arch, and you swap them for the ones with the 10-1/4" of arch, you will have a net gain (lift) of 2-5/8". On the other hand, if your original springs had 9-3/4" of arch, then the ones with the 10-1/4 would only give you 1/2" of lift.

 

thanks,

Tom

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JeepCo, what he's really saying is that (as usual) there are too many variables to answer your question directly. Until you know what you have to start from, you can't assess what something else will give as a result. His answer is, basically, that you'll have to remove one of the factory springs and measure its free arch before you know what your starting point is.

 

It's like the dweebs who tell ya to "throw in a set of ZJ V8 springs and you'll get 2" of lift/" Yeah, sure. Was that ZJ 5.2L, ZJ 5.9L, with or without Up Country suspensions ...? Not to mention that if you started with an XJ that had Up Country, a standard ZJ V8 spring is the same part number, so someone who follows such advice blindly could spend a bit of money and waste a bunch of time for exactly zero gain.

 

According to what HellCreek has provided, one size does not fit all.

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Hi, Twisty,

 

Me too. Actually, I was looking at the blueprints.

 

Jeepco,

 

It depends on what you have as a stock spring. Our 1989 Sport Truck had the 3+1 spring with a 8-3/4" standard arch and a capacity of 1100 lbs. Jeep also offered the same spring with 7-5/8", 9-1/4", 9-3/4" and 10-1/4" arch - all made from the same size steel, with capacities of 980 lbs., 1160 lbs., 1220 lbs., and 1280 lbs., respectively. They also offered a 4+1 spring with 9-1/8" arch and a capacity of 1440 lbs., and of course the metric ton spring with 3+2 leaves and a 9-1/2" arch and a capacity of 1700 lbs. Since the springs are pretty much the same, except for the last two, all you would have to do is subtract the arch on your springs from the arch on the new springs to see how much you would gain.

 

The lift springs that we are developing are based on the 1100 lb. springs that were on our Sport Truck, since they were the best all-around spring and would offer the best flex.

 

BTW, would anybody like to test our 6 inch rear SUA springs?

 

Thanks,

Tom

 

I sent you a E-mail reguarding the 6" rear SUA springs

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JeepCo, what he's really saying is that (as usual) there are too many variables to answer your question directly. Until you know what you have to start from, you can't assess what something else will give as a result. His answer is, basically, that you'll have to remove one of the factory springs and measure its free arch before you know what your starting point is.

 

According to what HellCreek has provided, one size does not fit all.

 

Do all springs have a stamping that designate their arch and, thus, capacity? Where is it, if so?

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JeepCo, what he's really saying is that (as usual) there are too many variables to answer your question directly. Until you know what you have to start from, you can't assess what something else will give as a result. His answer is, basically, that you'll have to remove one of the factory springs and measure its free arch before you know what your starting point is.

 

According to what HellCreek has provided, one size does not fit all.

 

Do all springs have a stamping that designate their arch and, thus, capacity? Where is it, if so?

 

All leaf springs (coils springs too) are built to a specific set of blueprints and specs. These include free arch, eye-to-eye length, # of thin / thick leaves, load rating, etc. etc. These specs are not stamped on the spring itself, but are recorded in the spring master blueprint database usually by the spring vehicle application or original factory part number. This database is used by custom spring builders like Alcan to build OEM spec springs or to design custom springs according to their customer's needs, like for a specific lift or load rating. There are only a handful of spring manufacturers left in the US. Most guys selling springs nowadays do not build their own springs anymore but contract them out to one of the US spring builders or overseas (read China). 'Course, the higher number of springs the marketeer orders from the spring maker, the less each spring will cost him, and hopefully pass the savings on to the customers.

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I used to use a place by my house in Long Beach, (Ca.) called "Long Beach Spring and Forge" for all my spring needs. I guess I took them for granted, assuming there were businesses like this in most major cities. I could pull in on a Saturday morning, tell the guys what I wanted, and watch them make my springs. It was kind of like getting a set of tires put on. They would cut the steel, wrap the eyes, give them arch, stick the leaves in the kiln, then pull them out cherry red and dunk them in a long tank of oil. It only took a couple of hours. If I found out later that something wasn't how I wanted I'd just go back and have a leaf added, changed, or removed until it was right. At the time I was working for a company that liked to use little trucks for big jobs so I gave them a lot of business. The old guys that owned the business and the property finally retired and sold the land when they were in their 60's and 70's. I can see how springs would be a science and a pain without a place like this.

I must be getting old too.

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