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Heavy Duty off road axles


BryGuy
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I've been doing a lot of reading concerning Comanche's and I'm getting close to purchasing my 1st one.

 

Once I purchase a Comanche, I intend to use it heavily offroad with 37"+ tires. For Wranglers the go to standard for offroading axles combinations is a Dana 60 (Ford, High Pinion, King Pin) and a 14 Bolt rear.

 

Would this be a good combination for a Comanche??? Any info/feedback would be greatly appreciated.

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depends on what tire size you're going to max out at. if you're gonna stay at 37's, those axles will be overkill, especially the 14 bolt. not to mention that with 'smaller' tires, the bottom portion on the 14 bolt differential hangs super low, and will be a rock magnet.

 

that being said, i will be running a 60/14 in my MJ eventually. The 14 bolt is a pretty good axle in stock form, and for relatively cheap, can be built to bullet proof specs. Shave the bottom of the diff, an do a disc brake swap, and youre in business.

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The money they are getting for the HP Dana 60s is rediculous :fs1:

 

yea, its disgusting. a Kingpin HP Ford dana 60 is like $1200 out here. and THEN you have to build it up :mad:

 

Chevy LP60's are going for about $700, but then you have to clock your TCase which opens up a whole 'nuther can of worms. :grrrr:

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By a cheaper GM D60 ( or even cheaper Dodge D60 ) and then get a spacer ( less than $100 some places) that will allow you to bolt your AX15 or AW4 to a pass drop D300 transfer case = all cast iron case with gear-to-gear operation that is considerably stronger than a 231. You get a D60 front and a transfer case upgrade for less than a Ford front D60. A LP D60 is plenty strong under something as light as an MJ. Everyone looks to tire diameter alone when considering axles and they ignore the vehicle weight factor.

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Yep, your front drive shaft attachment point will be down behind the front diff housing where your LP rear shaft will be at the same height and be the first to hit oncoming obstacles because the diff housing isn't in the way. :D I am in no way saying that a HP front isn't better, just that there is nothing wrong with a LP in most applications. Especially when you can find a lot better deals on LP D60 fronts. Mine came from under a drive able truck and ran me 25% of the cost of a HP Ford. Keeping $900 in my pocket was worthwhile for me. Maybe it won't be for others. Like most things, there are trade-offs.

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I currently run 6.5" lift, 35" tires and a HP D30.My diff housing has plenty of scrapes, and I have bent a few tie rods. But I also have a few scraped and dents on my front driveshaft and broke my last one. My lower control arms show major trail rash also.

 

When playing on rocks it doesn't matter what you hit first. Once the driver side front tire comes off a rock, the vehicle comes down upon it, sometimes directly behind the axle.

 

If it only matters what you would hit first I would also not have a scratched and bent transfer case skid, large dent in gas tank, or killed three driveshafts before I finally had a rock proof one made (3/16 wall DOM tubing).

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