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gas line disconnects


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Ok whoever designed these things should be beaten. What are my choices for bypassing or doing away with them. I got it apart but can not get it together and its full of rust. This is the one near the manifold. Can I just do rubber line and clamps like we did on the 70`s cars.

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sure, if your jeep is carbureted. The pressures in the EFI stuff is too high for rubber lines and worm clamps. This could be dangerous. Don't do it

 

I was going to tell him the same thing, but the connections on the fuel filter and on the tank itself are just rubber lines with hose clamps.

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40-50 psi is too much for rubber lines???? No. Make sure you get the reinforced nitrile rubber or Viton lines and it will work. You may want to throw a bubble flare into the steel line wherever you create the patch.

 

Like Geonovast said.. the piece from the pump to sender housing and from the sender housing to the frame rail are both rubber.

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Not a whole lot of shaking going on back there. Make sure it is HP reinforced and there is enough slack so that the engine vibrations don't do any damage. Putting a flare like whowey said is a very good idea. They also sell a clamp that is designed for trans and fuel hoses so that it won't cut in to the rubber like worm clamps do, but they are more expensive.

 

I still think it is a bad idea to use rubber hose near the engine, but I'm getting out voted here. (and if you deadhead the fuel pump, it will probably put out more like 80 to 100 psi)

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Well a local garage just today when I walked in was unpacking a Dorman gas line repair kit. Very nice kit from what I can tell. He had the end to repair it so all is good on the line. Still fighting the no spark issue after the engine change see my other post.

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I still think it is a bad idea to use rubber hose near the engine, but I'm getting out voted here. (and if you deadhead the fuel pump, it will probably put out more like 80 to 100 psi)

 

 

I'm not crazy about a non-steel line near the engine either. But you could create a sleeve of aluminum over the rubber tubing for the heat resistance. Yes.. the pump will put out quite a bit more than 40-50psi if deadheaded. But that's what the appendix(ballast resistor) of the 4-litre is for. And there are tubings that will easily take that much pressure. Teflon FEP or Tefzel would work nicely.

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The ballast resistor is not to decrease the pressure. It is to decrease the sounds from the noisy pump. It is bypassed at start up and full throttle, and never existed in 87, although they used the same pump.

 

The fuel pressure is regulated by a valve on the rail, with the excess pressure bled back to the tank.

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