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Tool distributors (Mac, SnapOn, Matco, Cornwell)


dfreeman616
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Anyone on here a distributor for them? I've been giving the idea some consideration, and I'm looking for some insider opinions that don't come from the guys trying to sign me up for one. I'd like to know good things, bad things, time commitment involved (realistically), and if you don't mind some idea of the profits and what kind of time it took to start seeing a reasonable income. If you don't want to post it on here, feel free to just shoot me a PM about it.

Thanks for any help.

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i've been a technician for a while now. i looked hard into becoming a distributor. i chose not to for a couple reasons. first off, they looked at me like a dollar sign, not as someone they wanted to help become successful. they wouldn't even talk to me till they ran my credit. i understand they don't wanna waste time on losers, but it was a negative expereince all around. i talked with my trusted tool guys i've known for years, they see their distributors as their customers. you are a dollar sign to them, not an associate.

 

snap on has the only program where they will help you start, you make less profit, but you'll have less risk and money out of pocket, and they will buy back the tools after a certain time if you want out. but, i've talked to some guys where that didn't actually pan out as good as it sounded.

 

i spoke with cornwell, snap on, mac and matco, so i got the same feelings from them all. it does take a lot of money up front, you own everything right away. you need at least 50 grand to start, and thats not much, and thats not paying for everything, thats just a down payment as you will be financing much much more.

 

i have a local matco guy that is the best around, is the trusted guy in this area, and he is retiring soon. he is going to be selling his route and inventory all together, now that would be the ticket. an established number one guy, taking you around saying here's the guy taking over my show. sorry to ramble on, if you wanna talk more about it let me know, i could go on for a while, as i spent months on this myself.

 

edit: an in depth knowledge of tools is needed. and there's millions of tools. i've dealt with too many tool guys that know what a ratchet and wrenches are, but are clueless on the millions of special tools and stuff a technician needs. without this knowledge you will be past over by technicians.

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I looked in to Snap On about 15 years ago. At that time, it was $65K to start, which bought you a small truck with a complete inventory. I was in the process of going through with it when my brother-in-law at the time back out on me as a partner. I don't know about the other companies, but with Snap On, it is your business, your baby, win or loose.

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i've been a technician for a while now. i looked hard into becoming a distributor. i chose not to for a couple reasons. first off, they looked at me like a dollar sign, not as someone they wanted to help become successful. they wouldn't even talk to me till they ran my credit. i understand they don't wanna waste time on losers, but it was a negative expereince all around. i talked with my trusted tool guys i've known for years, they see their distributors as their customers. you are a dollar sign to them, not an associate.

 

snap on has the only program where they will help you start, you make less profit, but you'll have less risk and money out of pocket, and they will buy back the tools after a certain time if you want out. but, i've talked to some guys where that didn't actually pan out as good as it sounded.

 

i spoke with cornwell, snap on, mac and matco, so i got the same feelings from them all. it does take a lot of money up front, you own everything right away. you need at least 50 grand to start, and thats not much, and thats not paying for everything, thats just a down payment as you will be financing much much more.

 

i have a local matco guy that is the best around, is the trusted guy in this area, and he is retiring soon. he is going to be selling his route and inventory all together, now that would be the ticket. an established number one guy, taking you around saying here's the guy taking over my show. sorry to ramble on, if you wanna talk more about it let me know, i could go on for a while, as i spent months on this myself.

 

edit: an in depth knowledge of tools is needed. and there's millions of tools. i've dealt with too many tool guys that know what a ratchet and wrenches are, but are clueless on the millions of special tools and stuff a technician needs. without this knowledge you will be past over by technicians.

 

 

 

 

Went through this last year when the first round of layoffs came at work. Everything Dave has said is EXACTLY the same as I experienced. Talk about completely turning someone off.... and BTW the 'out-the-door' price with Snap-On was a bit under $250k with a new truck.

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i've been a technician for a while now. i looked hard into becoming a distributor. i chose not to for a couple reasons. first off, they looked at me like a dollar sign, not as someone they wanted to help become successful. they wouldn't even talk to me till they ran my credit. i understand they don't wanna waste time on losers, but it was a negative expereince all around. i talked with my trusted tool guys i've known for years, they see their distributors as their customers. you are a dollar sign to them, not an associate.

The Matco rep I talked to hasn't ran my credit yet, but that is the next step. I can understand that, they are putting out a fair amount unless you throw the full $250k down at once, after all.

snap on has the only program where they will help you start, you make less profit, but you'll have less risk and money out of pocket, and they will buy back the tools after a certain time if you want out. but, i've talked to some guys where that didn't actually pan out as good as it sounded.

I haven't heard back from Snap-On yet, what do they do to help you start? Matco (the only one I've had any real discussion with) has a fairly in depth training and start up program, but that's not financial help, although they do have financing.

i spoke with cornwell, snap on, mac and matco, so i got the same feelings from them all. it does take a lot of money up front, you own everything right away. you need at least 50 grand to start, and thats not much, and thats not paying for everything, thats just a down payment as you will be financing much much more.

Like I said, haven't talked with Snap-On, Cornewll, or Mac yet. I've heard too many bad things about the franchise program from other sources now, since they were bought out by Stanley while back.

i have a local matco guy that is the best around, is the trusted guy in this area, and he is retiring soon. he is going to be selling his route and inventory all together, now that would be the ticket. an established number one guy, taking you around saying here's the guy taking over my show. sorry to ramble on, if you wanna talk more about it let me know, i could go on for a while, as i spent months on this myself.

I may take you up on that sometime, got a number I could call? I was thinking about the buying out a retiring distributor, but that requires finding one.

 

edit: an in depth knowledge of tools is needed. and there's millions of tools. i've dealt with too many tool guys that know what a ratchet and wrenches are, but are clueless on the millions of special tools and stuff a technician needs. without this knowledge you will be past over by technicians.

Aside from working on my own cars, I have state certs for all areas of auto repair and currently do it for side income. I don't know all the tools, but I certainly know how important the right tool is and how much difference simple things like a ratcheting combo wrench can be, much less some of the custom pullers, sockets, and other tools can be.

 

Thanks for the input so far, I still have a lot more to look into to be satisfied with the decision either way. Today I did get to talk to a Matco distributor who says he wishes he'd started 10 years earlier, so it depends on the situation.

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