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rust in engine, freeze plugs


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This is actually a copy of my MJ project question but I thought I'd post it here too to see if get an answer.

Here it is.

 

 

Bloody hell,

The waterpump was leaking.....somewhere.

Problem was it only did it while running and of course it was somewhere underneath the pulley.

So.....off with the whole front end of the truck again. All was smooth until I went to take off one of the waterpump bolts and the head snapped off. Luckily there was just enough bolt sticking out of the engine that I grabeed on with vice-grips and got it out.

Bought another waterpump just to make sure the one I have wasn't defective.

In the meantime I stuck a garden hose up to the small hole above and to the left of the hole for the impeller and shot water thru there to try and clean out any more gunk. All was clear and I let it sit till today but when I went out the once clear water was murky brown ( I thought it was oil in my water at first but upon closer inspection found that the "brown" wasn't really brown, more of an orangish and it was settled at the bottom. So I have a good amount of rust in the engine.

1)Is this normal?

2)Should I run more water thru it and try to remove as much as possible or leave it since it will just keep rusting?

3)Freeze plugs were brought up. I see them on the driver's side of the block. Are there any on the other side? How do you remove them? And what are the chances of removing them with the engine still in the truck?

4)What are the chances of me removing them and screwing something else up?

_________________

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How long did you let it sit with plain water in it? If only a day or two, you only have surface rust. If a week or mmore, you really should close everything up (use the old water pump), run it with some fast flush in it, then flush everything out ... again.

 

Then do NOT let it sit. Antifreeze is also anti-rust. You can't leave an engine with plain water in it. It will rust, very quickly.

 

Yes, there are freeze plugs on both sides of the engine, as well as on the back. Chances of punching them out and replacing them with the engine in the truck? Small. Some are easy to access. Others are impossible.

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I hate doing freeze plugs, in fact when I built my stroker I paid them to do them. I would rather that I not have to deal with them while the block is still in the truck.

 

Rust in the block is pretty common. Especially on an iron block, copper radiator, aluminum water pump and outlet setup. You get a lot of electrolysis between metals immersed in water. Flush the block out, prestone makes a kit that hooks up to the hose, then refill it and add some water wetter. It is a pink liquid that lowers the surface cohesion of water letting it make more contact with metals and absorb heat. It also has a lot of anti corrosion properties.

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This is actually a copy of my MJ project question but I thought I'd post it here too to see if get an answer.

Here it is.

 

...orangish and it was settled at the bottom. So I have a good amount of rust in the engine.

1)Is this normal?

2)Should I run more water thru it and try to remove as much as possible or leave it since it will just keep rusting?

3)Freeze plugs were brought up. I see them on the driver's side of the block. Are there any on the other side? How do you remove them? And what are the chances of removing them with the engine still in the truck?

4)What are the chances of me removing them and screwing something else up?

_________________

 

 

Answers in Project thread, but maybe more people will see it here :D

1) Yes, if you have hard water

2) Run water through 'till it runs clear, then drain and fill with distilled water. The rust is not from the engine, the rust is from the iron in the tap water.

3) No need to replace freeze plugs unless you are rebuilding the engine (even then it's iffy) or one is leaking. I imagine replacing while engine is in vehicle will be very difficult if at all possible

4) The chances of you removing them with the engine in the vehicle is slim. The chance of messing something else up while *attempting* to remove them is higher.

 

I would run tap water through (you installed one of those flush kits, right?) until it runs clear, then drain and fill with radiator flush and distilled water. After a few hours or so driving with that, flush with tap water until it runs clear again, then drain again and refill 50/50 with antifreeze and distilled water. Or use the premixed stuff, but that will cost you more.

 

The key here is draining after using tap water and using distilled water. Leave tap water in the block and within 10 minutes you'll have rust again. Rust is very good at plugging up radiators. In case of emergency, rain water (if available) is an acceptable substitute. Lots of pollutants, but no iron.

 

It took me 2 years and 3 radiators before I figured out this problem the hard way by myself.

 

edit to add: the water wetter is also a good idea. I believe the purple ice stuff is just that, although an expensive one.

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