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Manche757

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On 2/28/2020 at 10:25 PM, Manche757 said:

I am often curious what some of the names CC members give themselves might mean. It would be great if you you share the story/meaning of yours. Unimaginably, 757 is my area code

 

 

In my eyes, since I lived in the city Boeing airliners are built, I would've thought you worked on 757's at their plant in Everett, WA.

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No to the 757, but years ago I was on audit teams at the Gulfstream plant in Savannah and got to tour the space shuttle and the private jet of an Arab shiek that were in for servicing. Same two Rolls Royce engines and wings in a 747. You work for Boeing?

 

Share a few words about how you chose your name

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Nooooo...I got out of the Navy, The Lazy B gave me the run-around. A few decades later, my niece marries a 4th-gen 'ranch hand,' and I find out from him that there are certain things that Boeing wants to see on an application. Had I known that 30 years ago, my life might've turned out differently. But oh, well, I can't dwell on what could've been.

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On 6/1/2020 at 4:06 PM, tugboat95 said:

Turning two, 97(in), fixed pitch, propellers. Mounted in CNF, Type 37, kort nozzles. For a rated 4,200 horsepower.

 

Got a few pics, from inside the hull and outside,  to share of this? How is the shaft sealed to keep the sea out with so many rev's and constant wear?

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On 2/28/2020 at 11:25 PM, Manche757 said:

I am often curious what some of the names CC members give themselves might mean. It would be great if you you share the story/meaning of yours. Unimaginably, 757 is my area code

Mine is just manche but i spelt it weird for some reason

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Manche757,

 

Pictures are from 2 separate shipyard periods of the tug Choptank. I'm no longer on her. She was built in 2005. I'm now on the Delaware built in 2016. But they are 98% the same vessels. The Choptank has what is called a Cutlass bearing and a drip shaft packing. The gland holds up to seven 1 inch rings of packing material made out of graphite. Water leaks thru it at a controlled pace (hopefully) to allow the shaft to be cooled. This water is collected into a coffer dam and is pumped back over the side. This is a constant maintenance item and is adjusted regularly. (Pumps like to fail).The picture with no shaft and a hole in the bulkhead is the gland being replaced. We tighten down a collar just like any other packing gland. When We run out of adjustment we add another piece. My current ride has dripless shaft bearings. There is no adjustment. Very precisely made with some high tech crap I don't really understand. But water flows in and out of the gland but not into the boat. The pics of the shaft show this system. Notice the two valves. These are basically a vent pipe and have to remain open in order for water to flow. Both systems have a rubber inner tube like a tire that remains deflated. It can be inflated by a bicycle pump. When inflated it seals against the shaft for a water tight seal so I can perform maintenance on them. The dripless couplings require very little attention. 2 years on this boat, I've never touched them. I LIKE dripless couplings. No coffer dam, no pump or piping to deal with. Fourth from last picture is the bolt up coupling from the shaft to the reduction gear (transmission) engine at 1550 rpms(max) is reduced to a shaft speed of 210rpms. We usually run 180 to 200 rpms. The last few pics are of the dripless coupling and the shaft.

 

I added a pic of the towing winch. Double drum Intercon. Thing is a beast. And the one of all the piping and valves is my fuel system. I have 8 fuel tanks onboard with a total legal capacity (hold more) of 78000 gallons. I generally load to 72 or 73. I also carry 8800 gallons of fresh water and can make up to 60 gallons an hour with a water maker.

 

By the way, I brought the Delaware from Jacksonville Florida to Seattle (and three other boats over a year). Approximately 42 days. Panama to LA was 17 days. Left Panama with 78000 gallons of fuel. Arrived in LA with 27000. We did not have enough to get to San Francisco. Approximately 5 grand is inaccessible due to tank pickups are not on the bottom (where trash collects)

 

Oh and I know all about the 757. Lots of guys out here are from Norfolk area and the Eastern Shore. Shoot I think we employ 3/4 of Tangier Island. Myself, I'm 3 hours south of you in a small town of New Bern, I live right on Hwy 17.0cdd281211fa27ca8ca0d0c2f94b7018.jpg91c806073656818a093fb654a88a90ac.jpgd71930b6932e62922c1d977b8fb77574.jpg4ef74c4e9b9ba9b187936524717fae1a.jpge06936d3dc3f9bef2b4d0f975ca835dc.jpgbd6c3deeeee5c40c10f409c22991214a.jpg810fcc9e868ab62fef87d8dc865a35e0.jpgaed3141020765e5c7c2324d9b457e8db.jpg45fcf2f92102ce7c4403f9986678161e.jpge7077545f6ad1177ee44fa398638f07e.jpg69a882202e9cc30753f29c7fab6a21b6.jpg

 

89 Comanche

Eliminator

2wd

4.0L

5 speed PukeGoat

Factory Original

 

 

 

 

 

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Got a few pics, from inside the hull and outside,  to share of this? How is the shaft sealed to keep the sea out with so many rev's and constant wear?
I don't really know how to work the app in using on my phone. See my above post.

89 Comanche
Eliminator
2wd
4.0L
5 speed PukeGoat
Factory Original


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Tugboat95,

 

Thanks for taking the time to write all that up along  with the pictures.  After reading your comments, I became curious how water was kept out of ships 150 year ago and googled that.  Basically the same system you describe.  I include a link, for others here that might be interested.  The 60 gallons per hour of fresh water is made by reverse osmosis?  I think nearby to you Ocracoke Isand uses that for their municipal water system.   The 7th picture with all the valves: Are those lines filled with hydraulic fluid to control various systems?

 

https://www.quora.com/How-is-the-driveshaft-of-a-ships-propeller-sealed-to-prevent-water-from-getting-into-the-ship-And-how-did-this-technique-change-in-the-last-150-years

 

If you will, speak to the trip through the Panama Canal and how an ocean going tug does in rough open seas. I understand that water to refill the locks comes from an unending supply of fresh water from a lake that stays full from all their rain.

 

I bought my second MJ from a small car lot in New Bern, which was a lot closer than the 1100 mile drive home from Texas for the first one.  I hope the 2018 flood of the Neuse River did you no damage.  I had thought you might be from Elizabeth City because of the Coast Guard base there.

 

8 hours ago, tugboat95 said:

I don't really know how to work the app in using on my phone. 

 

I think your not knowing how something works is a temporary condition.

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The 7th picture is my fuel manifold. Boat has 8 fuel tanks but engines only draw from 2. Called daytanks. I move the fuel around the boat both to keep the 2 daytanks full and to keep the boat level and trim, along with the freshwater. All this has to be done in accordance to the Letter of Stability every vessel has issued when built. Fluid moves around and if done wrong can affect vessel stability. Vessels have sunk because of this.

Panama Canal is a marvel of engineering to this day. They cut a canal thru a mountain and I mean thru a mountain to connect Gatun Lake to the Pacific. Called the Gailiard Cut, I may not have spelled that right. As well as built a series of locks to stair step vessels up and down. All done with dynamite steam shovels and manpower. Gatun Lake is 82 feet above sea level. It is constantly fed by rain over a vast area of mountains and collected there. Once you arrive you go thru an exhausting inspection by canal authorities. The canal provides over 25% of Panama GDP. Then you get in line. Cruise ships pay a premium to go thru in day light on a set schedule. Everything else is around them but money gets you moved to head of the line. Hazmat ships move only in daylight and in an afternoon convoy each way. Pass in the lake. Little ole us went thru at sunset into the night after a 4 day wait. Cost 100,000 for us to transit with a 350 foot empty barge. They charge a tariff on cargo. Loaded oil tankers are a million. Large containerships are 1.5 and up. Money is paid in full up front. There is no 30 60 90 day billing. A Panamanian pilot comes onboard and assumes command of the vessel. Everywhere else pilots are advisors nothing more. In the canal they are in charge and responsible. Approximately 45 vessels a day transit the canal total (both ways included). Transit lasts about 8 to 10 hours.

To transit along with the pilot a crew of deckhands comes onboard. The vessel crew steps out of the way. The new crew takes on lines attached to train locomotives. These are still delivered from shore by a row boat. The crew heaves them up and attaches them to the vessel. Oh I forgot to mention, transit required 50 thousand dollars worth of deck mods and gear installed at specified locations beforehand....They didn't use them!

The locomotive pulls you into the lock, its sealed and filled with water from the lake. When you exit, an outbound vessel slips in the same way and is lowered by the water being released. All gravity, there are no pumps. Basically sit and ride. Takes about 10 to 12 minutes to fill a lock and you share it with other vessels they can fit in with you.

 

Included are a few pictures. I had opportunity to go ashore twice for ship business. Panama City on the Pacific coast is beautiful, modern and clean. Cristobal on the Atlantic side looks like 1980s Beirut with military checkpoints and police have Uzzies on their shoulders.

 

Fishing was good off Guatemala. Caught 17 Mahi in 2 hours. Had to quit fishing because we ran out of freezer space.

 

As for rough weather. I'm on a 98 foot boat and have been over 200 miles offshore (most of the time we are around 20 to 30 miles). My last transit we were in 25 foot seas off of northern California for several days. When we passed the Columbia River we had 30 to 35 footers for about 18 hours. Never was more glad to get inside a breakwater than that trip. We were also attached to a 350 foot barge with a mile of 2 inch cable that was jerking us around. Anything above 12 foot or so is miserable. It affects everything. You don't sleep, peeing is a challenge best done sitting. Even that's hard to stay planted. You chase dinner across the table and of course cooking is hard to do but is manageable. Everything had to be secured. Even the coffee pot....especially the coffee pot. In the engine room all the equipment has Marine oil pans. Basically they are twice the amount needed to allow for this type of movement.

This marks my 30th year at sea. I've sailed offshore the vast majority of it. I've had enough. I'm now content with working a harbor tug in LA/Long Beach fueling ships. I'm currently assigned to the first tug I brought out west when my company expanded out here 2 years ago. I like the idea of my bunk not moving in a vertical inclination while I'm in it. I also like the fact that the toilet is no longer a moving target. I don't have any good pictures of rough weather. I've learned pictures just don't get it. Videos do tho.48cfa4aeb10cd98ce32de5018d83a287.jpg637abed7fa2111e9f3c047058a7e22af.jpg53e7415b50d4bd1ba36a33c6bde15ae3.jpgbf448edce8cc95de863c2bb9a2fd1280.jpgedc58b61eeb06a386183227f4005ef3b.jpg5e3a623670410bc955407217bc4f52db.jpg68980136b06c1076431533fac9fff8f2.jpgde4784a85d1bc9bbdda0910859da4684.jpgf0f11769af8ca0cb114b202e8af62daf.jpg94dc6c8430b6619e7e840fffd35c9e15.jpg

 

89 Comanche

Eliminator

2wd

4.0L

5 speed PukeGoat

Factory Original

 

 

 

 

 

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The Canal and locks were a marvel of engineering in their day...but malaria was a constant PITA to deal with. Medical and health advancements by the U.S. Army Medical Corps tackled that. I served on an aircraft carrier, and it still only takes fifteen-foot seas to make life aboard ship challenging (aircraft operation regulations forbid flight ops with the ship's roll exceeding 8 degrees list), but I had buddies on smallboys (destroyers and frigates) that had the same kind of challenges you have on your tug. At least I never had to chase a meal or pee sitting down from rough weather!

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