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Knucklehead97

Finally got me a workbench!

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Got a week off of work and have immediately gotten busy on projects!

 

Been needing a workbench that could stand up to anything, so after a month of research I stopped by Lowe's today and got to work. Total cost (including a 25$ box of 2 1/2" screws) was 104$. It's made entirely out of 2x4's and 2x8's. The front is twice as thick to withstand extra pounding on the vise. Last thing to do is run 1/2" lag screws into the bottom of the legs through the floor of the shed.

Depth is 29", height is 32", and length is 10'. 

 

Almost 100% built with Harbor Freight power tools! I love my Bauer impact driver, Admiral miter saw, and Chicago Electric miter saw stand. 

 

 

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Solid looking bench. How about a back guard, to prevent pushing things off the back of the bench. Ask me how I learned this.

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5 minutes ago, Ωhm said:

Solid looking bench. How about a back guard, to prevent pushing things off the back of the bench. Ask me how I learned this.

Already got a plan for it! Just didn't get enough 2x4's. Going to lay 2x4's between the studs on the back,  level with the bench. Will give me more workspace and fix the issue of parts coming off the back :L:

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one idea that my buddy showed me: put a layer of sacrificial plywood on the top.  you're going to beat the snot out of it anyway and this way you can easily replace it. :D 

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1 hour ago, Warren Mohler said:

or wrap it in sheet metal so you wipe clean

 

1 hour ago, Pete M said:

one idea that my buddy showed me: put a layer of sacrificial plywood on the top.  you're going to beat the snot out of it anyway and this way you can easily replace it. :D 

I've been thinking about both! I'm going to try sanding the top and throwing a sealer on it once I get a good oscillating sander. The 4- 2x8's only cost about 30$ so if I tore up this top it would actually be less expensive to replace than plywood or metal. I did it exactly 10 feet long so that if I ever have to replace the top I don't have to measure or cut. Next project is adding a shelf underneath and getting things hung on the wall in front (tools, battery chargers, ect) 

 

Next BIG project is getting power to the shed. The lights currently are ran through 100ft of extension cord, which is fine since they're LED. But it's a pain to do every time I go to the shed. I found an empty 2 breaker slot in my outdoor breaker box so plans are to run 6/3 UF-B from the box (will have 60 amp breaker in place) to the shed with a 100 AMP sub panel in the shed. From that panel I will have 1 20 amp plug beside the sheds window which will have power for the AC unit I'm installing and the lights on the ceiling. Then a 20 amp circuit for both walls with 4 plug boxes on each. Then I will still have room for a 220v outlet if I ever feel I need to install one!

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Ended up having enough scrap 2x4's to piece together the filler pieces between the studs! Now just to sand the top and create a shelf below. 

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7 hours ago, Knucklehead97 said:

6/3 UF-B from the box (will have 60 amp breaker in place) to the shed with a 100 AMP sub panel in the shed. From that panel I will have 1 20 amp plug beside the sheds window which will have power for the AC unit I'm installing and the lights on the ceiling. Then a 20 amp circuit for both walls with 4 plug boxes on each. Then I will still have room for a 220v outlet if I ever feel I need to install one

I am sure you have thought about it, but is that enough to handle all the possible load? How far will you be running the 6/3?

 

An AC unit draws A LOT of juice. Combine that with a welder, some lights, a radio blasting, a fan running, etc.... I can see you easily breaking the circuit/ generating heat/ etc. Just chew it around a bit. Always build bigger than you think is needed. It will turn out to not be enough in the end.

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15 minutes ago, JustEmptyEveryPocket said:

I am sure you have thought about it, but is that enough to handle all the possible load? How far will you be running the 6/3?

 

An AC unit draws A LOT of juice. Combine that with a welder, some lights, a radio blasting, a fan running, etc.... I can see you easily breaking the circuit/ generating heat/ etc. Just chew it around a bit. Always build bigger than you think is needed. It will turn out to not be enough in the end.

It's going to be ran about 75 feet. Everywhere I've read says that #6 is enough for it. The AC unit is as small of one as you can get since the shed is only 12x16. My thought process is that I'm VERY rarely going to have everything running at the same time. I'll look into seeing how much it'll be for #4 wire though and it might be worth it for the price!

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