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This is kind of a weird one:

 

Ever since I bought my truck a couple years ago, I'd had issues with the driver's front coil spring rubbing the track bar bracket.  The truck appears to have a couple of inches of lift and the sway bar ends were so very close to the springs, so I swapped them out for longer Ford F-350 ends, as I recall.   I also installed a new OEM track bar once.  I recently replaced the whole setup (track bar, & frame bracket) with an aftermarket Core 4x4.  The Core 4x4 frame bracket didn't save me from having the same clearance problems.  My driver's spring continues to be within 1/8" or so from the frame.  The passenger side clears much better--mainly because there's no bracket taking up clearance room.

 

So, my goal is to center my front axle over the chassis of the truck to get rid of my occasional rubbing noise.  I'd attempted this with the new OEM track bar as well as the Core 4X4 bar.  Not really much success because of that contact point at the track bar frame bracket.  I even removed and shaved off some edge metal from the Core 4X4 bracket to help provide clearance and get rid of the rubbing (which sounds awful on braking/cornering actions).  Looks like that wasn't enough to solve the issue.

 

I'd tried centering the axle by using a tape, measuring the distance between the front fender flares and the edge of the front tires.  Last time I did this, I had to use a come-along to pull the chassis towards the passenger side to get my measurement equal on both sides.  Even when they measure equally, I still have 1/16" to 1/8" or so clearance from that coil to the track bar bracket.  

 

1.  So, do I have perhaps thicker springs up front than stock?  If my tape measure reads the same on both fenders, and I still get this rubbing, then maybe this is the reason...?.

2.  Is there another, more advisable method of measuring the centering the axle?

3.  This sounds kinda dumb, but when centering, I'm essentially moving the chassis over to the axle and not vice-versa to find center, right?  I would think that the chassis follows the axle (the axle being the solid anchoring point).  Am I correct in this thought?

4.  Are my springs out of whack maybe?  Eyeballing them, they look straight if that means anything.

 

There is no body damage that I can tell...never been in a wreck to my knowledge.  Also, the springs were the same color as the original paint--again, if that means anything.

 

Something very screwy is going on here--I would think a guy would never have to shave some metal off of a track bar bracket (stock or aftermarket) to provide spring clearance.

 

I'm thinking I have something going on with parts, or maybe there's a better centering technique that I'm not yet aware of.

 

I'd love your thoughts, guys.

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Axle/chassis centering is handled by the track bar -- that's what it's there for. The factory track bar is designed to center the axle under the chassis when the chassis is riding at stock ride height. As soon as you introduce lift, the axle is pulled off center toward the driver's side.

 

The way to measure is to be sure both front tires are the same size and at the same pressure. Park on a known flat and level surface. Drop a plumb line from the fender flare on each side and measure from the plumb line to the tire or wheel.

 

Adjusting for center after a lift is best done with an adjustable track bar.

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Either your front axle is not set up correctly......or............your springs are garbage .........or........both. 

 

 

Quality parts. :L:

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3 hours ago, Eagle said:

Axle/chassis centering is handled by the track bar -- that's what it's there for. The factory track bar is designed to center the axle under the chassis when the chassis is riding at stock ride height. As soon as you introduce lift, the axle is pulled off center toward the driver's side.

 

The way to measure is to be sure both front tires are the same size and at the same pressure. Park on a known flat and level surface. Drop a plumb line from the fender flare on each side and measure from the plumb line to the tire or wheel.

 

Adjusting for center after a lift is best done with an adjustable track bar.

I appreciate you sharing.  I was aware of the purpose/function of the track bar.  And it looks like you and I measure the centering of the axle the same way.   Also, my aftermarket CORE 4X4 track bar is certainly adjustable (as are likely all aftermarket track bars).

 

I suppose I was asking about the numbered questions in my original post.

 

58 minutes ago, Jeep Driver said:

Either your front axle is not set up correctly......or............your springs are garbage .........or........both. 

 

 

Quality parts. :L:

I'll go through and recheck setup if Eagle and I have the best/preferred or only method of centering the axle.  I'm guess I'm kinda leaning towards bad springs.  

And I agree....quality parts.  CORE 4x4 track bar is impressive.

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24 minutes ago, coolwind57 said:

I appreciate you sharing.  I was aware of the purpose/function of the track bar.  And it looks like you and I measure the centering of the axle the same way.   Also, my aftermarket CORE 4X4 track bar is certainly adjustable (as are likely all aftermarket track bars).

 

I suppose I was asking about the numbered questions in my original post.

 

I'll go through and recheck setup if Eagle and I have the best/preferred or only method of centering the axle.  I'm guess I'm kinda leaning towards bad springs.  

And I agree....quality parts.  CORE 4x4 track bar is impressive.

OME 930..............if you are already at 2-3" lift.............OMEs are the only springs you want to look at.

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On 7/15/2019 at 11:51 AM, coolwind57 said:

1.  So, do I have perhaps thicker springs up front than stock?  If my tape measure reads the same on both fenders, and I still get this rubbing, then maybe this is the reason...?.

 

 

What's the outside diameter of your coils, and what's the wire diameter?

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got a photo of the contact area?

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I just went thru this issue.  To avoid spring rubbing, three things have to be set correctly:

1.  The axle must be centered under the chassis by adjusting the track bar so that distance from the outside of the wheel to the outer edge of fender flare is equal on both sides.   On a lifted MJ/XJ, this will require an adjustable track bar.

 

2.  The axle spring seat must be centered under the spring seat on the chassis.   On a lifted vehicle, this usually means extended control arms are needed if the lift is over about 2 inches.

 

3.  The axle spring seat must be PARALLEL to the one on the chassis.  This keeps the front spring from bowing in a manner that will cause it to hit the track bar bracket on the chassis.  The only way to control this parallelism is with adjustable control arms.  (This will also control your caster angle as well.)

 

It sounds like you have tried to control all of the above, but the one variable that seems unknown is if the springs are really intended for an MJ/XJ.  If their OD is too large, no amount of adjustment will compensate.

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