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ok, I have look and looked and search internet for anything and can't find.  I'm spraying interior and going to clean up and respray the vents. I don't know how to get these out. Has anyone done it??  It looks like there are 2 rivets and seems to be glued. How do they come out with out breaking anything?  Any help would be GREATLY appreciated!  

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The actual swivel vent comes out. The two molded pins that it pivots on, flex to allow you to remove it. Same for all vents. Since you have the panel out, it should be relatively easy to see how the are installed. Sorry - don't have a picture of it.

 

Removing them lets you do a good cleaning. 

 

Doesn't really help the bigger question of removing the entire black plastic assembly.

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Yea, was hoping that the plastic surround would have had a easier solution..  lol. Speaking of "vents" what are the fake ( I'm guessing) vents on the lower dash on the ends? just for "decor" or something acc go there??

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BTW-those are not “rivets” holding the vent assembly to the tan trim panel.  Those are “heat staking” joints where the one plastic piece is melted over the other to form the equivalent of a riveted/welded joint.

 

Careful use of a Dremel tool can separate the pieces, but a suitable adhesive just then be used to reattach them.

 

because of this, masking the one piece while painting the other is best for this type of situation.

 

i say this because, when I worked for a living, we used heat staked parts all the time in plastic assemblies.

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So best way for that piece would be to clean real good and paint it while on there? Or just a real good cleaning be better. 

1 hour ago, AZJeff said:

BTW-those are not “rivets” holding the vent assembly to the tan trim panel.  Those are “heat staking” joints where the one plastic piece is melted over the other to form the equivalent of a riveted/welded joint.

 

Careful use of a Dremel tool can separate the pieces, but a suitable adhesive just then be used to reattach them.

 

because of this, masking the one piece while painting the other is best for this type of situation.

 

i say this because, when I worked for a living, we used heat staked parts all the time in plastic assemblies.

 

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Unless the black part is chalky, just mask it and paint the tan part.  Otherwise, mask the tan and also paint the black part satin black.

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