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I did a SOA lift. I have the Rusty's RX300 reservoir shocks.

 

The rear axle is a Chrysler 8.25 from an XJ, stripped of all of its mounts. So I need to weld new shock mounts.

 

 I'm debating on the changing the shock mounts, angle, and rotation. 

 

1. Use original factory design. Weld shock mounts on axle same direction as the ones on the frame (parallel to axle)

 

2. Use factory top mounts, but weld new axle mount opposite direction of the factory top mounts. ( EX  Top = __ and Bottom = |  ) My reasoning is the shock will be able to tilt for flex, and tilt as the axle swings back as it goes up, due to the shackle. (obviously the bushing on the shock will allow that tilt, but limited)  

 

3. make a new top shock mount and weld new mounts on axle,  /  \ something like that. 

 

I was also thinking of putting these on the factory top mounts to change the angle of the shock, 

 

http://lgcdn.jeep4x4center.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/t/e/teraflex-shock-mounting-bracket-TF-1514700-bm_1511.jpg

 

 

There are a few threads on rear shock installs, but not a lot of pictures. anyone want to share pictures of their install? 

 

Lastly, when I started my thought possess, I was thinking the shaft of the shock should be at ~50% when the truck is static. However, after putting more thought on it, I'm thinking its best to have only ~20% to 25% of the shock when truck is static. Allowing for greater droop / drop. As an axle is flexed (such as putting a tire 12" high, and the other tire 10" lower), as the axle is flexed up, the whole truck also lifts in 

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I did a SOA lift. I have the Rusty's RX300 reservoir shocks.

 

The rear axle is a Chrysler 8.25 from an XJ, stripped of all of its mounts. So I need to weld new shock mounts.

 

 I'm debating on the changing the shock mounts, angle, and rotation. 

 

1. Use original factory design. Weld shock mounts on axle same direction as the ones on the frame (parallel to axle)

 

2. Use factory top mounts, but weld new axle mount opposite direction of the factory top mounts. ( EX  Top = __ and Bottom = |  ) My reasoning is the shock will be able to tilt for flex, and tilt as the axle swings back as it goes up, due to the shackle. (obviously the bushing on the shock will allow that tilt, but limited)  

 

3. make a new top shock mount and weld new mounts on axle,  /  \ something like that. 

 

I was also thinking of putting these on the factory top mounts to change the angle of the shock, 

 

http://lgcdn.jeep4x4...700-bm_1511.jpg

 

 

There are a few threads on rear shock installs, but not a lot of pictures. anyone want to share pictures of their install? 

 

Lastly, when I started my thought possess, I was thinking the shaft of the shock should be at ~50% when the truck is static. However, after putting more thought on it, I'm thinking its best to have only ~20% to 25% of the shock when truck is static. Allowing for greater droop / drop. As an axle is flexed (such as putting a tire 12" high, and the other tire 10" lower), as the axle is flexed up, the whole truck also lifts in proportion to the articulation. So having equal length on the shaft may not be optimal. Is this what most of you have done?  

 

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This is the exact thing i have been wondering myself. I too have an 8.25 freshly stripped and ready to swap, but don't know where to place the axle shock mounts. After a bit of reading, it seems the most effective position for shocks to be in, is directly parallel to the path of travel that is going absorbed. More or less a perpendicular line from the axle to the frame. However this might not be as conducive for those of us who take out trucks offroad, not to mention the fact that the factory shock angle is already tilted backwards at 35* or so. Supposedly once your shocks reach a 45* angle they loss 50% of their dampening effectiveness.

 

Are you trying for a double angle? Angling the shocks both towards each other and backwards or are you just going to manipulate one angle?

 

 

Looking forward to what others have to say.

 

FPC.

 

 

 

EDIT: I had another two paragraphs typed out and accidentally hit refresh. Thought i was going to cry. . .  :cry:

 

 

Here's the short and sweet. don't angle the shocks backwards or forwards the axle dosent move in either direction so there would be nothing to gain. Depending on the level of flexing you do, angle the shocks towards each other / \ and mount them so that they can pivot around an axis. Think about the direction the tire is traveling when it flexes and the path of the shock  as it compresses/droops, as for the mounting think about double shear track bars and how they allow for greater flexibility.

 

 

 

FPC.

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What's wrong with just using the factory mounts?

 

 

Nothing i suppose, for the regular dude they are just fine. But, for those who off-road more seriously; since your tires don't move perfectly straight up and down when flexing, shocks that are mounted similarly would not be as effective as shocks mounted at a slight inward angle.

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For my SOA, I have the Modified Lower Shock Mount Plates, (Flipped and Cut to Sit Properly).

I have had No Issues with them at All. 

Not to Mention, Easier to get a New Set of Shocks, due to Original Mountings.

After the SOA Conversion, STOCK Length Shocks worked Just Fine!!

Net Lift = about 6 inches.

 

After I get the Metric Tonne Leaf Springs with 2in Lift, I Still only need to find Shocks with 3-5in Lift.

Even though Total Lift for Rear is about 10 in.

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  • 3 years later...

Soo for a truck that sees about 75-80% road use and 25-20% offroad, like a weekend warrior how should the shocks be mounted / \ angled towards each other or just use the stock ones and not worry about it.

 

Sorry for raising the dead but I don't really like starting new threads if there is one, gotta love that search feature

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4 hours ago, Pete M said:

shocks work best on the road when they are inline with the direction of travel, aka up and down. :thumbsup: angled shocks are more for offroad toys that see lots of wheel travel.  

 

Ahh thanks for the info Pete, I guess I will run the stock upper mounts for now. If I feel the are limiting performance in the future I may change them up

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My SOA rear kept the original shock position but I went slightly longer shocks at first and just welded on shock mounts. I had planned to use the anti-swaybar plates that I saved from the front of a Jtruck to put between the bottom of the spring pack and top of the axle mount but since my axle doesn’t have mounts yet, I’m going to make some with the mounting hole already in it.

 

Front antisway bar plates.

 

7c2abb025fb868e6c7f7f122cff481de.jpg

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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On 11/3/2017 at 8:44 PM, Swampy said:

 

Ahh thanks for the info Pete, I guess I will run the stock upper mounts for now. If I feel the are limiting performance in the future I may change them up

 

 

This makes so much sense to me.  Why change it if it is not broke??

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