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Hello all,

 

After numerous searches I am looking for some advice on replacing all 4 shocks.

 

I'm just replacing to restore ride quality.

 

Couple questions I have are:

 

Is there any thing to look for before starting other than how rusty they are(thanks to lovely Minnesota)?

 

Any procedures or certain ways to do things to save time and/or hassle?

 

What most commonly breaks while removing the old shocks?

 

What to do if I break a upper rear shock mount/stud?(looking pretty rusty have been soaking in JB-80)

 

Please link any other posts or diy's I may have missed.

 

Appreciate any help, and thanks in advance!

 

-Cody

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get bilstien 5100 series shocks,

worth the extra buck

 

the upper shock mount in the rear is the one that will break,

heat the nut, and freeze the stud, and tighten first then loosen, slowly loosen/tighten this will remove all debris off threads without binding and snapping the stud off

 

 

when you install the new ones, the metal crush sleeve is not installed on the rear shocks

it does not fit over the existing studs

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Agree, put heat to it before you start cranking the nut off. A propane plumbers torch may work or may not, just not as hot of a flame as it looks. If you have access to oxy-acetylene, just be very carful working around the fuel tank, garage, and yourself. A couple of different techniques, you can get the nut hot and let it cool completely. Sometimes that's good if you just need to crack the nut loose. For severely rusted threads, I use Mopar Rust Penetrent, and get the nut cherry before cranking it off hot.

 

The front's are bolted in at the bottom, so the hardware is replaceable and would be good to replace with some frest metric hardened bolts.

 

Other stuff you might want to mess with are the front sway bar bushings and links. Pretty relatively inexpensive to replace the rubber with new rubber or polyurethane, provided you don't have issues removing the bolts that hold the sway bar mounts to the frame.

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Appreciate the help thus far guys!

 

Now let's say I get working away....and the upper mount bolt/stud snaps while attempting to take the nut off...

This will be the last time the truck gets new shocks as I will be eventually selling it an year or two....what would be your remedy to get a shock back on there?

 

Just weld the correct size bolt/stud to whatever is left on the stock mount?

 

Front's aren't a worry as you said I can just replace with new hardware...I just have a feeling stuff is gonna break in the rear...

 

I should have access to most of everything you both stated....torches, mopar rust penetrant etc etc...the one thing I am unsure is if I'll have something that will be able to freeze the stud.

 

What do you use to "freeze" said stud?

 

I will also keep spraying with JB-80 daily until the replacement happens.

 

Lastly, are the front's easy enough to get out with just using a jack on the side you are replacing?

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The upper mount isn't any standard bolt or stud. The part that fits into the shock bushing is smooth, and larger in diameter than the threaded portion. That's so the nut and washer can seat against the shoulder of the shank to properly compress the shock bushing without over-compressing it.

 

If the nuts look badly rusted and don't seem to want to come off, don't even fool around. If you don't have a nut breaker, get out the Dremel and grind one flat of the nut until it cracks, and you can turn it. You do NOT want to think about replacing the shock stud.

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  • 2 years later...

The upper mount isn't any standard bolt or stud. The part that fits into the shock bushing is smooth, and larger in diameter than the threaded portion. That's so the nut and washer can seat against the shoulder of the shank to properly compress the shock bushing without over-compressing it.

 

If the nuts look badly rusted and don't seem to want to come off, don't even fool around. If you don't have a nut breaker, get out the Dremel and grind one flat of the nut until it cracks, and you can turn it. You do NOT want to think about replacing the shock stud.

Do you know what the thread is on that stud so I can get a die to chase the threads?

Thanks.

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Agree, put heat to it before you start cranking the nut off.

 

Or be safe and just use a nut buster.

 

41au92chKPL._SY355_.jpg

 

http://www.amazon.com/Nut-Splitter-Tools-2-Pc-Set/dp/B0000AX88Q%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q%26tag%3Dduckduckgo-d-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3DB0000AX88Q

 

Use anti-sieze when installing the new shocks.

 

Of course, I said all that three years ago ...

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  • 2 years later...
On 11/14/2013 at 1:38 PM, MinnesotaManche said:

Now let's say I get working away....and the upper mount bolt/stud snaps while attempting to take the nut off...

This will be the last time the truck gets new shocks as I will be eventually selling it an year or two....what would be your remedy to get a shock back on there?

 

Just weld the correct size bolt/stud to whatever is left on the stock mount?

 

 

There is NO good fix for if you break off the upper rear shock mount -- so don't do it. If it looks rusty, use a nutbuster to break the nut. It will then come off cleanly and all you have to do is replace the nut. Same for the bottom. Use anti-sieze when you install the new nuts.

 

spin_prod_1049598612?hei=624&wid=624&op_

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22 hours ago, Goose_XJ88 said:

Digging up this old thread because I did break off an upper stud. 

 

I'm a CA boy and not used to dealing with any rust so I only used on blaster which is usually enough.

 

How can I fix my mistake?

 

ahh..... welcome to the club.  It's a very exclusive club that requires just the right combination of bad luck and swear words to join... 

 

 

I guess I never posted the final solution in that thread.  I ended up ordering a long threaded rod from zoros.com and had a shop weld it on for me.  I did not grind off what was left of the broken stud.  The welder said that would have been a bad idea.  Instead, the guy welded up over what was left of the original stud and mated it with the new piece to ensure a solid bond.  Below is the only picture I could find at the moment.  The fix was still a work in process at this point.   After this photo,  we made sure the stud was straight and level, then did some shaping of the weld joint with a grinder to make sure the shock bushing could slide over it.   The fix has held rock solid for nearly a year now with several wheeling trips.  Good luck. 

 

Wj8mwUW.jpg

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