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Advice for clutch bleeding........


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Hi there Comanche Fans, this is happyjeep. I own a 1986 Jeep Comanche 2WD with a 2.5L TBI and an AX-5 5 spd. man. transmission. I will make this brief and specific as possible. I had a defective master cylinder and later discovered that the slave cylinder was defective too. The clutch line is intact and shows no signs of debris or deformation, when I applied air pressure at one end of the hose. The fork doesn't appear to be broken and the clutch shows no damages. I made sure that the linings were tightened well with the correct line wrench and was able to bleed the system as pressure begins to build up. No progress of disengaging the clutch has been reported so far and this is where the troublesome I'm facing. Therefore, here are the questions:

 

1. How long does it take to bleed the system? Is it the same time as bleeding the brake system?

2. I found there is another method by Alldata and an AMC proceedure for clutch bleeding appears. Proceedure is done by compressing the slave cylinder with the special tool. I use sizable bolts and nuts to fit my steering wheel puller to do the job. The pedal was firm, the pressure was good, but the clutch still did not disengage. Has anyone followed this oddball proceedure?

3. To the question above, is there any other methods in clutch bleeding? If so, please kindly share.

4. I ended up using the old school way of bleeding. It's done by haviing some assistant pumping clutch pedal # of times and holding as the other tech opens and closes valve to relieve air bubbles. Has anyone done this? Is it successful? How many times the person must pump the clutch pedal before holding to the floor?

 

Thanks for your input. I will take your advices in consideration.

 

happyjeep

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Its a jeep not rocket science, the procedure is pretty much the same for any ol' truck, my wife and I do it together.

 

Person number 1 lays under the truck after ensuring master cylinder is full, using a backup wrench, hold bleeder assembly and undo bleeder nut with other wrench, report "DOWN".

 

Person number 2 presses clutch pedal to floor when finished holds it there and reports "DOWN"

 

Person number 1 then closes bleeder screw and reports "UP".

 

Person number 2 then allows clutch pedal to rise to full extent, when finished report "UP"

 

REPEAT process.

 

P.S.

 

Watch out for the fluid, it stings the eyes.

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4. I ended up using the old school way of bleeding. It's done by haviing some assistant pumping clutch pedal # of times and holding as the other tech opens and closes valve to relieve air bubbles. Has anyone done this? Is it successful? How many times the person must pump the clutch pedal before holding to the floor?

That's not the correct procedure. Correct procedure is as BORDENCOMANCHE spelled it out. "Pumping" the peddle is not necessary, and is actually counter-productive because it introduces air bubbles into the brake fluid. Since the purpose of bleeding the system is to remove air, this is not a good thing.

 

You don't press the peddle down and then open the bleeder. As BORDENCOMANCHE noted, the underneath guy opens the bleeder, then the inside guy depresses the peddle. Peddle is held down until the bleeder is closed, then the peddle is allowed to return, and the process is repeated. The peddle should be depressed moderately slowly, at a uniform speed. The inside guy should not "stomp" on the peddle and try to floor it in an instant.

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  • 4 years later...

when I bled my clutch it was with all new parts. I ran a return line back to the master with a one way valve and got the bubbles out of the system that way. After I did this I still had problems with my clutch disengaging and it was bad parts, so I had to do it all over again with different parts.

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Be aware that the line between the master and slave should be replaced.

 

There was an issue with them from 84 through 86 where the rubber of the line reacting adversely with DOT brake fluid and forms crystals from the disintegrating lining of the hose. Those abrasive pieces work their way into both cylinders over time. 

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